Reference Work on Legal Status of Women Bibliography


From Karen L. Cox <karen.cox@murraystate.edu> 30 Oct 1997

Is there a book that can provide specific references to ways in which women's rights were limited prior to the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s? I want to be able to identify specific ways in which women were denied access to things like their own credit cards or home loans (without a male co-cosigner), or the existence of quotas that limited the number of women accepted to graduate schools, etc. Thank you. From M_Raymond@compuserve.com Tue Dec 9 11:16:16 1997 Date: Sat, 8 Nov 1997 18:30:59 -0500
From: Maria Elena Raymond <M_Raymond@compuserve.com> To: Melanie Shell <melanie@h-net.msu.edu> Subject: Reference Work on Legal Status of Women/Responses #1

[The following text is in the "ISO-8859-1" character set] [Your display is set for the "US-ASCII" character set] [Some characters may be displayed incorrectly]

Responses:

Anthony, Susan B., et al. _The History of Woman Suffrage_

Hayden, Dolores _Redesigning the American Dream: The Future of Housing, Work, and Family Life_(W.W.Norton & Co., 1986, c1984).

Other Suggestions:

See the special issue of SIGNS that was produced on Women and the American City:
Women and the American City / edited by Catharine R Stimpson ..[et al.]. (Chicago,University of Chicago Press,1981.) See also other authors working in the planning and design field such as Leslie Kanes Weisman, Sandra Rosenbloom, et al.

In addition, the suffrage newspapers, The Woman Journal (which became the Woman Citizen and then reverted to Woman Journal again) reported status from time to time but did not have comprehensive surveys. It is available on microfilm and has a good index.

Several good surveys were published by the League of Women Voters (1919 to present) and later by the Women's Bureau (1920s forward) before your 1960 date. After 1960 the Presidents Commission on the Status of Women issued annual reports on the legal status of women in the US. The InterAmerican Commission and the UN issued world reports sporadically.

A 1922 Survey compiled by Mrs. Carina C. Warrington, Attorney at law for the LWV is available on microfilm or fiche in the Pamphlets in American History series from the collection at the Wisconsin Historical Society. (B-256 No. WO61, Card 1 of 1, to p.30.

A 1927 report, LWV Committee on the Legal Status of Women, the Legal and Political Status of Women in the United States: A Summary of the Outstanding Facts in the Present Situation, November 1927. This is available in the Microfilm collection of the League of Women Voters. I do not have the cite, but there is a good guide and index with the microfilm collection of the LWV papers.

In addition, the National Women's Party surveyed the legal status of women as they initiated the Equal Rights Amendment drive that lasted for 52 years until it was sent by the US Congress to the states. From M_Raymond@compuserve.com Tue Dec 9 11:16:23 1997 Date: Sat, 8 Nov 1997 18:31:12 -0500
From: Maria Elena Raymond <M_Raymond@compuserve.com> To: Melanie Shell <melanie@h-net.msu.edu> Subject: Reference Work on Legal Status of Women/Responses #2

[The following text is in the "ISO-8859-1" character set] [Your display is set for the "US-ASCII" character set] [Some characters may be displayed incorrectly]

A very readable summary of women's legal status in the early 1970s is the classic book by Karen DeCrow, Sexist Justice. It was written in the 1970s and so is out of date for current legal status, but is a good starting point for the 1970s. Joan Hoff (Wilson) has a good recent survey of the history of women's legal status, and a nice article looking at status "The Unfinished Revolution: Changing Legal Status of U.S. Women" in _Signs_ 13(1987): 7-36. Another standard book is Leo Kanowitz, _Women and the Law: The Unfinished Revolution_ (1969). Like the DeCrow, the Kanowitz is a document from the period you are asking about. JRG