H-German Posting Guidelines

 
Queries Announcements Reviews FAQs

 

All messages intended for distribution to the list should be sent to h-german@h-net.msu.edu. Sending messages to that address (rather than to an individual editor) will insure that the message reaches the editor-on-duty.  H-German solicits submissions in both German and English. The editors will post messages as expeditiously as possible.  Be aware that some editorial or formatting changes may be necessary. The editors will not change the substance of your post without consulting you first. You can help us get your message out more quickly by adhering to the following guidelines:

1. If you are posting a query, please read our query submission guidelines below.
2. Provide a clear, concise, and logical subject line so that your fellow subscribers can quickly decide whether your message is relevant to them (the editors may edit the subject line for the purpose of clarity).
3. Sign your message, but omit lengthy signature elements (like quotations, designs, etc.)

 

H-German Policy on Queries

H-German is a scholarly community of over 2000 members worldwide who bring to this network a range of interests and expectations.  Since we are all busy professionals, the editors try, as a primary goal, to insure each message's utility to the maximum number of members. Conversely, we try to avoid postings that will be of limited interest or which could even bother or alienate subscribers.  Many of our subscribers approve of this editorial function and appreciate receiving less mail from H-German than from other e-mail networks.

For this reason, we would like to re-state our policy on queries:

1. All queries should concern research or teaching problems in German history only.

2. All queries should be sent ONLY AFTER all other easily available sources of information (such as the library reference room) have been exhausted.  In other words, H-German should not be the reference source of first, but of last resort.  Each query, then, should list those sources ALREADY TRIED that have failed to produce the information sought. Among other things, this will save the valuable time of well-meaning subscribers, who will otherwise respond with suggestions one has already considered.  Simple bibliographic queries will not be posted unless it has been shown that other resources have been exhausted.

3. All queries should be as informative as possible.  Provide background information so that H-German members who know little about the topic can still benefit from the discussion.  If, for example, you simply need the address of an institution, try telling the membership exactly what service the institution performs.  If you need bibliographic information, explain the context of the problem for which you need additional reading.  If you need teaching materials, explain the problem that you are trying to deal with in the classroom and the methods which you have tried so far.

4. The longer the query the better; short queries are likely to be returned to their authors for more background information so that the entire network can benefit.  Medieval scholars should be able to read a query about the Nazi era and learn something; so should social historians be able to learn from queries by military historians.

5. Queries will be posted as soon as practical, depending upon the current traffic on H-German.  In a particularly busy period, some queries that meet these guidelines may have to wait several days before being posted.

6. New subscribers to H-German must wait at least one month before posting a query, so that they may become accustomed to how H-German deals with queries and other matters.  No query will be posted for the benefit of non-subscribers.

7. Your suggestions for further revisions of this policy are welcome.

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H-German Announcements and Calls for Papers

The principle behind our guidelines is our desire to publish serious announcements that will be of high interest to our subscribers. While the general criteria for posting an announcement at H-Announce (http://www.h-net.org/announce/policy.html) also apply to us, the additional, more stringent criteria apply to H-German announcements. These criteria are intended as an extension of the principles described in our query policy (see above) and as guidelines for determining what interests our subscribers.

As our query policy notes, we prefer to err on the side of caution.  In order to protect our subscribers from a flood of cross-postings and repeated announcements, we reserve the right to decline to publish announcements that do not correspond with our definition of appropriateness to the list purpose. Disputes will be resolved in consultation with our advisory board and its decisions are final. Publication of an announcement does not constitute editorial endorsement of its content either by the H-German editors individually or as a group, the H-German advisory board, or H-Net.

Guidelines:

1. All announcements will be labeled with the prefix ANN: in order to facilitate easy identification. All announcements must include date, time, location, sponsoring group or institution and any other information the editors deem relevant to the announcement (such as cost of participation). Announcements judged incomplete will be returned for revision. The H-German editors reserve the right to apply more stringent criteria for announcements from institutions or groups with which they are unfamiliar.

2. H-German publishes two kinds of announcements: individual announcements of events of special interest, and summary announcements harvested from H-Announce that may be of general interest. Events and information relating primarily and specifically to German history in line with the mission statement of our list may receive an individual posting. More general announcements (for instance, on broad thematic topics that may have German applications) should be directed to H-Announce and will be published in our weekly summary announcement.

3. Announcements provided by H-German members will receive priority. Announcements on behalf of third parties submitted by members or non-members may be declined for this reason in line with our query policy. At the same time, the list is intended foremost as an information source and not an opportunity for self-promotion by individual members. Announcements deemed to be self-promoting may be revised or rejected at the editors' discretion.

4. In the case of an individual talk, in order to guarantee the accuracy of the announcement, the announcement must be submitted or endorsed by someone with a sponsoring and verifiable institutional affiliation (USHMM, University, etc.) rather than the speaker.

5. We seek to publish only announcements of national (within any particular country in which we have significant membership) or international interest. Announcements of primarily regional or local interest may be published at the discretion of the editors if they are deemed to be of broad interest; they may be declined at the discretion of the editors if this is not the case.

6. We are pleased to publish CFPs from our subscribers for panels at conferences. CFPs should be written in a way that avoids fishing expeditions to "see who's out there." For a CFP from a single member, the announcer should provide a detailed description of what he or she expects to speak about, what sort of papers are being sought and/or what the subscriber envisions for the panel. CFPs with two or more participants already in place can be less detailed.

7. H-German does not publish book announcements from individuals or presses. Announcements of relevant books can be forwarded to the book review editor, at whose discretion a review of the book can be solicited.

8. In general, H-German does not publish job announcements. We recommend that potential advertisers submit job announcements to the job guide.  In unusual circumstances, we may publish a job announcement; however, following H-Net policy, no announcements for jobs in North America will be published unless they have appeared in the job guide first.

9. In line with H-Net policy, we do not publish announcements relating to for-profit services or any information accessible only on a paid basis. Institutions or groups unknown to us who charge conference fees must verify their non-profit status and upon request, provide a detailed explanation of the reasons for the fee charged in their announcement.

10. Due to the subject matter of the list, H-German editors will be particularly vigilant with regard to materials that appear to glorify or support fascism, neo-Nazism, or right/left political extremism. While we encourage the discussion of such topics on a historical basis in line with the mission of the H-German list, we reserve the right to decline to publish materials that we deem to be primarily characterized by such qualities or motivated largely by a political rather than a scholarly agenda.

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H-German Reviews FAQs
 

1.

What is a review?

2.

How long are H-German reviews?

3.

How many reviews does H-German publish?

4.

What materials are reviewed?

5.

Why does H-German publish so many reviews of books on the twentieth century and especially on the "Third Reich"? Why aren't there more reviews of books in my subject area?

6.

I'm overwhelmed by the quantity of email I receive from H-German. Why do you publish so many reviews? Do you really expect me to read all of these?

7.

You missed my book/you miss so many items in your reviews program. Why don't you publish more reviews (like H-Soz-und-Kult)?

8.

What are some examples of materials not reviewed?

9.

How do I know whether my book is a scholarly book?

10.

Can I propose a book for review?

11.

The author of a scholarly book or other work has asked me if I would like to review a work/A press has written to me asking me to publish a review of one of its works. Can I publish a review in H-German?

12.

I've just run across a work that directly impacts my research and which I would really like to review. I don't have any vested interests that would impinge on my impartiality. Can I review it for H-German?

13.

I would like to review a film or museum exhibit. Does the "no volunteered reviews" rule apply to these media?

14.

What professional qualifications are necessary to review for H-German?

15.

How are books assigned to reviewers?

16.

I would like to review for H-German. How can I get involved?
17. I've been asked to review a book for H-German, but am uncertain whether I have a conflict of interest or can be impartial. Should I review the book?
18. I would like H-German to review my scholarly book. What do I do?
19. I have other materials (scholarly works not in English or German, fiction, poetry, art, film, exhibition, multi-media of any kind) that I would like reviewed in H-German. What do I do?
20. I’ve completed my review. What happens now?
21. Why do reviews have to be copyedited?
22. I sent you a copy of my book or other material for review. Why hasn't a review appeared yet?
23. I agreed to do a book review, but I can't fulfill my obligation now (for any reason). What do I do?
24. Will my university recognize reviews written for H-German in tenure, promotion and raise proceedings?
25. Who reads H-German reviews?
26. How many hits did my review get?
27. I would like to cite an H-German review. How?
28. Can you crosspost my review to another H-Net list?
29. I or someone else would like to reproduce my review in a different publication. What are the requirements for such publication?
30. I would like to publish a review originally published elsewhere in H-German. Can I do this?
31. My work was reviewed in H-German and I would like to respond. How?
32. Who adjudicates disputes about reviews on H-German?

 

1. What is a review?

A review is a brief, critical comment written from the point of view of a single individual determined by the editors to be qualified to make a judgment. H-German reviews are edited for grammar, style, organizational effectiveness, and precision of argument. While we may ask for revisions of the initial review copy submitted to us, H-German's editors will not interfere with the substantive content of a review or the critical judgment of a reviewer except in order to prevent ad hominem attacks or other violations of the rules of scholarly discourse. Final versions of reviews are published only after the permission of the reviewer has been received. H-German reviews are not refereed. While we work to preserve the impartiality of the review process, no review should be seen as the only possible objective statement about the value of a particular scholarly work.

2. How long are H-German reviews?

We do not enforce any word limits, but not every item merits a lengthy review. The length of a review should be gauged to the significance of the item under review, the potential audience, and the level of complexity involved in the critical comment. We have published reviews as short as 400 and as long as 10,000 words; in 2006, our average review length was slightly under 1700 words. 1200 words are usually sufficient unless the reviewer wishes to make a counter-argument. We enjoy this latitude because of our status as an electronic medium, but reviewers should be careful not to abuse the charity of the copyeditor or wear out potential audience members. The book review editor reserves the right to shorten wordy reviews or those with extensive summary or narration of information of which scholars of German history like our list members can be assumed to be aware.

3. How many reviews does H-German publish?

We aim to publish two reviews per business day (following the U.S. calendar), excepting the announced summer and winter hiatuses, usually of 2-3 weeks each. This schedule allows for maintenance and administrative work behind the scenes and guarantees the greatest possible attention to each review as it appears; it yields approximately 450 book reviews per year. Reviews of exhibits and films appear at the discretion of the film and museum review editors, as they become available. In order to sustain variety in the material reviewed, we commission enough reviews to generate a small backlog that permits us to take time to edit submissions carefully.

4. What materials are reviewed?

We aim to review all monographs and scholarly publications on German history written in English and a generous selection of those written in German, depending on the willingness of authors and publishers to provide us with review copies. Publications in other languages are selected on a case by case basis, usually depending upon our ability to find a reviewer. We also review reference works, primary source collections in German or English translation, textbooks, museum exhibits, works of photography, art, fiction and poetry, films, music CDs, CD-ROMs, DVDs, videotapes and television programs and other materials as deemed relevant to the purpose of the list by the list and review editor(s). In order to protect the scholarly quality of the list, H-German reserves the right to decline any material not deemed suitable for review for any reason. In areas where we tend to have a surplus of suitable material for review (one example: textbooks on military history of WWII), we may publish collected reviews of several works.

5. Why does H-German publish so many reviews of books on the twentieth century and especially on the "Third Reich"? Why aren't there more reviews of books in my subject area?

While we now review a much wider range of books than we have in the past, and we do make a substantial effort to commission reviews of items on period before the Wilhelmine Empire, it is still fair to say that the bulk of items reviewed on H-German concern the period after 1871. The major reason for this state of affairs is that this is the period on which the majority of books are published and on which the majority of our members are working. We only commission reviews from members of H-German, which means that the smaller number of scholars working on pre-modern topics necessitates a smaller reviews program in those areas. We do try to commission reviews of multiple items in order to compress the coverage of over-exposed topics, however, and we are certainly open to placing more "pre-modern" items for review! The best way to increase the number of reviews in your subject area is to notify us of your availability as a reviewer and to encourage colleagues in your subject area to join H-German and review for us as well.

6. I'm overwhelmed by the quantity of email I receive from H-German. Why do you publish so many reviews? Do you really expect me to read all of these?

We try to limit the amount of email we send you in order to avoid email fatigue, and indeed we reject a great deal of material in order to make our offering to you of as high a quality as we can. We doubt that every reader will read every review and indeed, we urge you to use the subject line of your email to decide immediately whether you wish to read material from us and delete it immediately if you do not or store it in a particular folder for later consumption if you do. All of the reviews are located in our logs and are eventually archived in H-Review, so even if you change your mind about reading a deleted review, it can be obtained easily from our homepage. At the same time, we strive to "be there to accompany your morning coffee," to provide an easy and regular way to connect with the larger world of scholarship in German history each day, even as you deal with the expectations of your position and the role you play in our field.

Our audience is composed of a huge variety of scholars with different needs--from the different periods they study to the demands made upon them by the different sorts of institutions in which they are employed, to their differing research ambitions and their different foreign language facilities. Ultimately we believe that we have an audience segment for the material in every review we publish, with smaller segments just as important to us as larger ones.

7. You missed my book/you miss so many items in your reviews program. Why don't you publish more reviews (like H-Soz-und-Kult)?

Our current schedule of publication appears to us to be an acceptable compromise between the absorption capacity of our readers and our ability to produce content. All of the editors are faculty members who volunteer their time in addition to their pedagogical and research responsibilities. Some aspects of the process (ordering and mailing books, copyediting reviews for style and archiving) are conducted by paid graduate student workers who are pursuing their own educations and for whose activities funds are limited. If you would like us to expand the scope of our activities, the best way to help us do so is to donate generously to H-Net.

8. What are some examples of materials not reviewed?

Though there are always exceptions, we do not usually commission reviews of:

--books primarily concerned with literature, psychology, sociology, or philosophy, unless the book clearly takes a historical approach
--German novels, poetry, fiction, art, music, film, etc., that do not deal with history
--children’s books or reference works intended for elementary and high schools 
--most memoirs, unless of historical significance
--reprints, unless the work has achieved some particular significance in the interval since first publication
--unpublished dissertations or theses
--books on demand that reproduce unpublished dissertations or theses
--books on demand that have not been subject to a refereeing process
--books on current events
--English books originally published more than two years ago, unless a paperback edition is published of a work missing from our reviews database
--German books originally published more than four years ago, unless a paperback edition is published of a work missing from our reviews database
--scholarly books with a focus on Europe as a whole and Germany secondly (though essay collections with a number of contributions on German history may qualify), unless they treat a field determined to be of interest to a significant number of list subscribers
--pseudo-scholarship produced as part of a political campaign or party program
--publications of presses identified as politically extremist, with particular attention, given the topic of H-German, to publications identified as sympathizing with the goals of National Socialism or neo-Nazism 

These judgments are made at the discretion of the book review editor in consultation with the editorial corps, whose decision is final.

10. Can I propose a book for review? 

The book review editor attempts to follow the catalogs of the major presses in German history, but is always grateful for suggestions. Send them in an email to the review editor.

11. The author of a scholarly book or other work has asked me if I would like to review a work/A press has written to me asking me to publish a review of one of its publications. Can I publish such a review in H-German?

No. Although we are aware that this policy differs from the usual practice in some countries outside of the United States, H-German, like many academic journals in North America, does not accept volunteered or unsolicited reviews. It is H-Net's editorial policy that review editors sustain the impartiality of the review process as much as possible by supervising the selection of potential reviewers and contacting them on their own initiative. This policy is in place to prevent the compromising of the independent review process, which is important to us because it often plays a formal role in tenure and promotion decisions in North American universities. Authors of books would thus rightly question any procedure that might introduce possible prejudices in the matching of books to reviewers. Publishing only commissioned reviews also allows the H-German editors to stand fully behind the reviews we publish in cases of dispute. We enforce this policy across the board in order to treat all books, book authors and all potential reviewers equally.

12. I've just run across a work that directly impacts my research and which I would really like to review. I don't have any vested interests that would impinge on my impartiality. Can I review it for H-German?

No. See #11.

13. I would like to review a film or museum exhibit. Does the "no volunteered reviews" rule apply to these media?

Because accessibility to these media is much more limited than to books, we occasionally accept volunteered reviews of films or exhibits. If you are interested in reviewing these media, please contact the film editor or the museum exhibit editor. Please be aware, however, that volunteered reviews cannot be archived in the H-Net archives (H-Review). Such content is characterized as an H-German review and is hosted solely on the H-German webpages.

14. What professional qualifications are necessary to review for H-German?

All reviewers are chosen by the book review editor from the list of H-German subscribers. We exert ourselves to find the most qualified reviewer possible within the different restrictions operating on this activity (for example, the most qualified reviewers have often already participated in refereeing of a scholarly publication; some reviewers are already engaged reviewing other books or are otherwise engaged; some of them will be reviewing a book for a different journal, and so on).

 Most H-German reviewers have earned a Ph.D. in history, German or Germanic studies, or another humanities or social science discipline. Many reviewers teach at secondary schools, colleges, universities and other post-secondary institutions, while others are museum professionals or work in various capacities for research groups, non-profits think-tanks, government agencies or other public services in many different countries. We allow graduate students with ABD status (that is, those who have completed all requirements for the degree except submitting the dissertation) to review works on the topic of their dissertations. Scholars in fields where the M.A. is the terminal degree are also accepted as reviewers, as are individuals significant qualifying professional experience. In order to ensure as full a coverage of academic publishing in this area as possible, very rarely a reviewer with a completed M.A. and enrolled in a doctoral program will be allowed to review a book under supervision of the doctoral adviser.

15. How are books assigned to reviewers?

We maintain an informal database of the research interests of H-German members to aid us in making assignments. Typically, when books arrive for review, the editor will search this database to find the most appropriate reviewer available. To the best of her ability, the review editor will make every effort to preserve impartiality and avoid conflict of interest in assignment of books. Reviewers who find themselves in conflict of interest are asked to recuse themselves voluntarily. In order to avoid conflicts of interest, books by the review editor will not be reviewed on H-German. Anthologies in which essays by the review editor appear will be supervised by a guest review editor from the editorial corps, usually the museum reviews editor. Reviews of books by members of the editorial corps will be supervised by a guest editor drawn from the advisory board. Reviews of advisory board members' books are supervised by the book review editor. In any other case where the book review editor feels compromised in the attempt to assign a review, a review of the work in question will be supervised by a guest editor drawn from the editorial corps. As to further conflicts of interest, the H-Net statement on this topic is considered to be in force.

16. I would like to review for H-German. How can I get involved?

H-German is always looking for more reviewers. Please send an email with your name, qualifications and a short description of the areas in which you would like to review to the review editor. Feel free to attach your CV. We maintain an informal spreadsheet of active reviewers and their interests.

In order to publish a review, you must be a subscriber to H-German with an active subscription (not disabled or set to nomail).

17. I've been asked to review a book for H-German, but am uncertain whether I have a conflict of interest or can be impartial. Should I review the book?

The book review editor is very grateful for the scruples of potential reviewers. In general, we follow the AHA standard: "an individual should normally refuse to participate in the formal review of work by anyone for whom he or she feels a sense of personal obligation, competition, or enmity." Specifically, this means that a potential reviewer should turn down the review editor's solicitation of a review if a circumstance (or a similar one) on this non-exhaustive list applies:

--s/he has refereed the work in question for a scholarly press, either positively or negatively
--s/he is quoted in pre-publication publicity for an item
--the author is his/her doctoral advisor or doctoral student
--s/he has been directly involved in the formation of the work in any decisive or fundamental way
--s/he has engaged in public polemic with the author in the past
--s/he is named in the acknowledgements of the work
--his/her relationship with the author of the work goes beyond one of professional collegiality
--s/he is involved in publishing (as an editor or publisher) the work in question or other works in competition with the work in question
--s/he feels for any reason that it will be impossible to provide an impartial judgment of the work to be reviewed.

In uncertain cases, the book review editor is happy offer her judgment as to whether a relationship constitutes a conflict of interest, but in the interest of confidentiality, potential reviewers should also feel free to turn down the solicitation of a review without any specific explanation.

18. I would like H-German to review my scholarly book. What do I do?

If your book in English or German meets the criteria mentioned above, simply have the publisher send a copy to:

ATTN: H-GERMAN
H-Net Reviews in the Humanities and Social Sciences
History Department
Michigan State University
8A Morrill Hall
East Lansing, MI 48824-1046
USA

You don’t need to contact us in advance unless you want an pre-determination of whether your materials fit our review criteria. We do not, however, return unsolicited materials if we are unable or unwilling to solicit a review of them.

Please DO NOT SEND books for review to any individual editor or to the departmental address of the book review editor. Sending review copies anywhere else than Michigan significantly lengthens the interval before your book will be placed, particularly during summers and academic leaves, when no one is there to process the mail, and can lead to expensive inefficiencies, as when more than one copy reaches us.

19. I have other materials (scholarly works not in English or German, fiction, poetry, art, film, exhibition, multi-media of any kind) that I would like reviewed in H-German. What do I do?

Contact the review editor with a description of the material review for review.

20. I’ve completed my review. What happens now?

Make sure you have submitted it--in its most careful, close-to-final formulation--to the review editor. Once your review has been completed, it is edited in separate steps by the H-German copy editor and the book review editor, who ensure that the content is acceptable, that the review conforms to the style sheet and that it is compatible with the listserv. The delay between submission and publication varies significantly depending on the amount of backlog; it is generally not less than two weeks and not more than six. Once this step is complete, the galley (a virtual “proof” of the review) is returned to you for final proofreading. Keep in mind that extensive changes to the galley may necessitate additional proofing steps. Once you have returned a proofread galley, it is put into the queue of completed reviews and will run in due course. We generally publish reviews in the order in which they are received, with slight changes to allow publications on a variety of topics each week. You should see your review run on the list, but you will also receive a courtesy mail specifying the initial link to your review in the H-German discussion log.

After another interval, usually no less than a month and no more than three months, the review is then archived in the H-Net Reviews index. This makes your review fully searchable, and facilitates its linking to the LOC pages. It also provides the review with a less cumbersome URL that can be used more easily in a CV.

21. Why do reviews have to be copyedited?

In general, every author profits from having another set of eyes cast over his work. Our priorities in H-German editing are to increase the readability of the reviews submitted and to make them conform to the H-Net style sheet and the conventions we use in our own publishing. This means, among other things, that English-language reviews will be edited to follow the spelling, grammatical and typographic conventions of the Chicago Manual of Style and that German-language reviews will be edited to follow the alte Rechtschreibung. These conventions are not matters of moral principle but simply allow us to create a unified style for H-German like that used in all professional publications. We continually review our commitment to alte Rechtschreibung. While we have no intellectual allegiance to it, it is simply the system with which our current editors are most familiar. For more information about the content of our style sheet, see the H-Net style sheet page.

22. I sent you a copy of my book or other material for review. Why hasn't a review appeared yet?

We do our best to ensure a review of every appropriate item we receive, although many factors are not under our control (including the postal service). Here is a brief description of what happens when an item is sent to us. Assuming that this item arrives in Michigan, is assigned to us, and meets the guidelines, we make a significant effort to place it with a reviewer. All books are offered for review in approximately two week cycles throughout the year and each item is offered for review as long as the editor can find the name of a qualified potential reviewer. Very occasionally (in less than a dozen cases per year since 2002) we do not succeed in finding a reviewer. Reviewers are typically assigned a deadline falling within four to six months of the assignment date. While not all reviewers complete their assignments on time for various reasons, overdue reviewers are reminded regularly and with increasing sternness to submit their reviews. Statistics for our 2006 board meeting revealed that we publish a review of approximately 92% of the items distributed within two years of the original deadline (a number significantly higher than many scholarly journals). We ask for the return of a book one year after the original deadline has been exceeded, by phone call or letter if necessary. Regular email reminders make it possible for us to urge delinquent reviewers to return books they will not be able to review, and we make every effort to place books with a second or even a third reviewer if necessary. Most submitted reviews are published within two to six weeks of submission depending on backlog and our effort to publish a variety of materials each week. If every step in this process happens according to plan, then, the fastest we can normally publish a review is within six months of receipt of the book, but a more realistic interval is nine months to a year. Please be assured that we do absolutely everything we can to ensure the quickest possible publication of our reviews, but that we cannot specify a date when a review of your book will appear.

Authors are understandably concerned about the progress of their books through the reviewing process. Please understand that in order to protect the independence of the reviewer and the entire process, we cannot share more information with you other than whether we have received your book. Reviewers are required not to distribute their reviews in any form before publication, and if we discover that a book author has attempted in any way to influence our review process or that a review has circulated in a pre-publication version, we will suppress the review and the item will be barred from review on H-German. 

23. I agreed to do a book review, but I can't fulfill my obligation now (for any reason). What do I do?

We certainly understand that occasionally, reviewers will be unable to meet their obligations. Although we would rather reschedule a review than find a new reviewer, occasions will arise when this is not possible. It is crucial in such situations that you return the book to us at

ATTN: H-GERMAN
H-Net Reviews in the Humanities and Social Sciences
Michigan State University
310 Auditorium Building
East Lansing, MI  48824-1120

USA

If you return the book, we will maintain you on our list of active reviewers, no questions asked. Receiving a complementary review copy is, however, the quid pro quo for the review you provide and the completed, edited review is H-German's contribution to a working relationship between H-German readers, academic presses and book authors. If you do not return a book that you agreed to review and do not submit a book review, your name will be removed from the list of the reviewers and we will decline to solicit a review of any monograph you publish until the situation is resolved.

24. Will my university recognize reviews written for H-German in tenure, promotion and raise proceedings?

Only the tenure, promotion and raise committees at your university can tell you the extent to which they value book reviews generally or electronic publishing specifically as an ingredient in your CV. However, H-German reviews are indexed in the OCLC databases and reach over 2,300 professionals working in the field every day, including leading scholars in the field nationally and internationally. If your evaluators reward print journal reviews, they should also be persuaded to consider H-German reviews.

25. Who reads H-German reviews?

Each H-German review is sent first to the list subscribers, an international group of more than 2,300 members working in German studies. Many reviewers find that they receive emails from colleagues responding to their review off-list. After an interval corresponding to the current backlog, it is put into more permanent format (“archived”) and a notice of the archived review is published on H-Announce.  Reviews are also frequently cross-posted to other H-Net lists and reach additional audiences in that way. Finally, H-Net reviews are linked in the online databases of the Library of Congress, a service that allows them to reach an even wider audience; some individual university libraries link to this information in their own computer catalogs.

26. How many hits did my review get?

The H-German pages receive approximately 3,000-5,000 hits per week. We do not keep statistics on hits per individual page. H-Net Reviews pages regularly receive more than 20,000 hits per week, and more during peak periods like exam time.

27. I would like to cite an H-German review. How?

A suggested format for citation is located at the end of each archived review, at the bottom of the page.

Reviews can be listed in the CV just as print journal book reviews are, with the final link to the logged review.

28. Can you crosspost my review to another H-Net list?

Every H-Net list has its own unique policies about when, whether and what to crosspost. H-German editors can post only to the H-German list. If you are interested in having your review crossposted to another list, we suggest that you contact the editors of that list.

29. I or someone else would like to reproduce my review in a different publication. What are the requirements for such publication?

Currently, H-German reviews can be reproduced in any non-commercial context with the permission of the author of the review, as long as the reproduction includes a reference to the original publication of the review in H-German, along with the author and date, and H-Net: Humanities and Social Sciences.

As we are eager to know where our reviews are published, we would be grateful for notice of such reprinting.

30. I would like to publish a review originally published elsewhere in H-German. Can I do this?

In order to protect our readers from email fatigue, we are very careful about re-publication of reviews. In general, we will not publish a review that appeared elsewhere unless (1) it is a crosspost from another H-Net list and (2) the subject matter is of high interest to our readers and (3) the review is of notable quality.

31. My work was reviewed in H-German and I would like to respond. How?

Generally, authors are offered the response to respond formally to reviews of their work at the discretion of the book review editor (usually if the review is more than typically critical of the book). In order to receive the opportunity for a response to be printed at the time of the review, you must be an H-German subscriber or agree to subscribe, and you must agree not to circulate the completed review in any form before its publication in H-German along with your response.

If you were not offered a formal opportunity to respond to your review, however, you may still respond on the list. Just send your response to the list editor at H-German@h-net.msu.edu. Keep in mind that (like the review) the response must deal with substantive issues of interpretation and avoid ad hominem attacks. The editors reserve the right to decline to publish any response they deem not adhering to the still-evolving conventions of scholarly discourse and netiquette.

32. Who adjudicates disputes about reviews on H-German?

Should a dispute arise about a review or the response to a review that involves a request to post to the list, the book review editor will attempt to resolve the issue in consultation with the editorial corps. Should no resolution about a decision to post to the list be forthcoming, the editorial corps will present the case to the advisory board, who may ask the disputing parties to submit information for their consideration. Decisions on disputes about posting to the list will be made by majority vote of the advisory board on the same basis as for other disputes about whether to post. Should no resolution be forthcoming, the disputants may contact H-Net's Vice President for Networks pursuant to the procedure described in section 2.02(c)(i) of the H-Net bylaws.

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