Table of Contents 16.2 (1996)   17.2 (1997) ISSN 1943-3840

Cervantes


VOLUME XVII, NUMBER 1 SPRING 1997


PERSPECTIVES ON CERVANTES STUDIES

Photo: José María Casasayas
Foto Rúquel, Montilla

IN HONOR OF

JOSÉ MARÍA CASASAYAS

Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America


Cervantes

Bulletin of the CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA


THE CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

President
JOHN J. ALLEN (1997)

Vice President
CARROLL B. JOHNSON (1997)

Secretary-Treasurer
WILLIAM H. CLAMURRO (1997)

Executive Council

FREDERICK A. DE ARMAS MW STEVEN HUTCHINSON
HOWARD MANCING NE DOMINICK FINELLO
GEORGE A. SHIPLEY, JR. PC EMILIE BERGMANN
EDUARDO URBINA SE ALISON P. WEBER
AMY R. WILLIAMSEN SW JUDITH A. WHITENACK

Cervantes: Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of  America

Editor: MICHAEL MCGAHA

Book Review Editor: EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN

Bibliographer: EDUARDO URBINA

Editor's Advisory Council

JUAN BAUTISTA AVALLE-ARCE       EDWARD C. RILEY
JEAN CANAVAGGIO ALBERTO SÁNCHEZ

Associate Editors

JOHN J. ALLEN     LUIS MURILLO
PETER DUNN HELENA PERCAS DE PONSETI
DANIEL EISENBERG GEOFFREY L. STAGG
ROBERT M. FLORES ALISON P. WEBER
EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN AMY R. WILLIAMSEN
CARROLL B. JOHNSON DIANA DE ARMAS WILSON
FRANCISCO MÁRQUEZ VILLANUEVA

Cervantes, official organ of the Cervantes Society of America, publishes scholarly articles in English and Spanish on Cervantes's life and works, reviews and notes of interest to cervantistas. Twice yearly. Subscription to Cervantes is a part of membership in the Cervantes Society of America, which also publishes a Newsletter. $20.00 a year for individuals, $40.00 for institutions, $30.00 for couples, and $10.00 for students. Membership is open to all persons interested in Cervantes. For membership and subscription, send check in dollars to Professor WILLIAM H. CLAMURRO, Secretary-Treasurer, The Cervantes Society of America, Dept. of Modern Languages, Denison University, Granville, Ohio 43023. Manuscripts should be sent in duplicate, together with a self-addressed envelope and return postage, to Professor MICHAEL MCGAHA, Editor, Cervantes, Department of Romance Languages, Pomona College, Claremont, California 91711-6333. The SOCIETY requires anonymous submissions, therefore the author's name should not appear on the manuscript; instead, a cover sheet with the author's name, address, and the title of the article should accompany the article. References to the author's own work should be couched in the third person. Books for review should be sent to Professor EDWARD FRIEDMAN, Book Review Editor, Cervantes, Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese, Ballantine Hall, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405.

Copyright © 1997 by the Cervantes Society of America.



Cervantes
VOLUME XVII, NUMBER 1


INTERNATIONAL COLLOQUIUM ON
PERSPECTIVES ON CERVANTES STUDIES
IN HONOR OF
JOSÉ MARÍA CASASAYAS

SELECTED PAPERS

EDITED BY JOSÉ RAMÓN FERNÁNDEZ DE CANO Y MARTÍN


TABLE OF CONTENTS


      Prólogo
      JOSÉ RAMÓN FERNÁNDEZ  DE CANO Y MARTÍN 4

ARTICLES
      Revisión del cautiverio cervantino en Argel
      ALBERTO SÁNCHEZ

7

      After a critical overview of recent biographies of Cervantes, this article focuses on scholarship concerning the crucially important five years Cervantes spent as a captive in Algiers, examining such controversial issues as: Was Cervantes a converso? Was he a homosexual? Why did Cervantes's master Hasan Pasha spare his life after he attempted to escape? To what extent was Cervantes influenced by Muslim culture?

      Aproximación al proceso Ezpeleta
      JEAN CANAVAGGIO

25

      Don Gaspar de Ezpeleta was mortally wounded on June 27, 1605, in Valladolid, at the doorway of the house where Cervantes lived with his family. Ever since 1886 —the year when the transcript of the investigation of the case carried out by Judge Villaroel was first published— Cervantes scholars have sought to prove the innocence of the author of Don Quixote in this matter.
     The present article is not concerned with that issue, but rather seeks to contextualize the case, fleshing out the background against which the events took place. The many details contained in the document give us a much fuller understanding of the activities of Cervantes, a man of whom his sister said that “he writes and does business and, because of his good ability, has many friends.”

      Tradición e innovación en la novelística cervantina
      EDWARD C. RILEY

46

      In his greatest and most ambitious novels Cervantes was mindful of the famous ancient examples of that genre, or of like genres. The present article examines how the antecedents of the Coloquio de los perros (The Golden Ass, Lucianesque dialogues) and of Persiles y Sigismunda (Heliodorus's Aethiopic History) served as a point of departure for Cervantes's novelistic creations. What both works have in common is that the most basic innovation is achieved through the constant interruption of the principal narration.

      Contexto crítico de la poesía cervantina
      PEDRO RUIZ PÉREZ

62

      Criticism of Cervantes's poetry has been conditioned by theoretical and esthetic presuppositions which have yet to surpass the prejudices forged by his contemporaries and apparently consecrated by the words of the author of Don Quixote. A biased reading of some of his metapoetic affirmations and the comparison established between verse and prose have distorted critical and interpretative perspectives, which can be corrected only by reconsidering three factors: the interposition of characters in the fictitious enunciation of most of the poems; the revision of the esthetic and communicative problematics posed by these texts and their narrative frame; and finally, the inclusion of Cervantine poetic writing as part of the wider process of poetic and esthetic renovation that occurred at the beginning of the seventeenth century.

      El soneto del rufián “arrepentido” (en dos series)
      J. IGNACIO DÍEZ FERNÁNDEZ

87

      In spite of recent critical interest in Cervantes's poetry, there are still many “poesías sueltas” attributed to Cervantes for reasons that are less than convincing. One such case is the sonnet “Maestro era de esgrima Campuzano,” which, according to a manuscript now lost, is by Cervantes. This article reviews the different arguments employed to support the attribution to Cervantes and compares them with those which can be made in support of attributing the poem to Diego Hurtado de Mendoza. A close reading of the sonnet offers purely textual proofs, after which the relationship of the text to other works by each author is considered. After some general reflections on criteria of attribution, the conclusion proposes the likeliest authorship.

      “Et per tal varier nature è bella”: apuntes sobre la variatio en el Quijote
      PATRIZIA CAMPANA

109

      This verse from the Petrarchan poet Serafino Aquilano, cited in several of Cervantes's works, often illustrated one of the most widely accepted literary precepts in the Golden Age: that of variety as a source of beauty, in imitation of the variety present in nature. The technique of variatio is notably manifest in the intercalation of secondary novels in the primary plot of Part One of Don Quixote. As Cervantes himself attested, these narrationes were criticized by his contemporaries, which led him to suppress them in the Second Part of his novel; nevertheless, the author did not renounce variatio, but rather evolved in its application by introducing digressions that were more closely connected to the main plot. This evolution may have resulted not from outside criticism but from the author's own reflections on the literary genre he had inaugurated: the modern novel.

      Cervantes: El juglar zurdo de la era Gutenberg
      JOSÉ MANUEL MARTÍN MORÁN

122

      Don Quixote is a text conceived for dissemination through printing, yet it still preserves many aspects of orality in its structure. The conflict between written and oral culture, omnipresent in the novel, enables us to account for a whole series of characteristics of Cervantes's masterpiece —such as its peculiar system of textual coherence, the mechanisms of narrative generation, the relationships among characters, the conception of authorial voice, the treatment of literary authority, etc.— which distance it from traditional narrative genres and make of it an enduring classic.

      “Porque lo pide así la pintura”: La escritura peregrina en el lienzo del Persiles
      CARLOS BRITO DÍAZ

145

      The present article attempts to illustrate the metaphorical use of an old symbol, the “world as book,” in Cervantes's final work, Los trabajos de Persiles y Sigismunda. The novelist's playfulness is accompanied by profound meditations on the role of art and on the well established comparison, introduced by Renaissance treatises, of painting with poetry. Contemplating a contemporary polemic on behalf of the liberality of painting, Cervantes reflects on the novel, and on the exercise of novel-writing, with the metanarrative backing of history as rendered on canvas (painting), of pilgrimage become textual unwinding (embroidery), and of the narrative, “book of books,” as a simultaneous becoming of narrations and narrators (writing). The art of memory, emblematics, and the philosophical concept of the chain of Being crown this artistic allegory of the novel, as work and as genre, and of the human condition.


NOTES
      ¿Fueron censuradas las Novelas ejemplares?
      FRANCES LUTTIKHUIZEN 165

      Perspectivas en los documentos cervantinos
      KRZYSZTOF SLIWA 175


REVIEWS
      Henry Higuera. Eros and Empire: Politics and Christianity in Don Quixote.
      (ROBERT M. JOHNSTON) 180

      Cervantes, Miguel de. The History of That Ingenious Gentleman Don Quijote de la Mancha. Translated by Burton Raffel.
      (ALAN BURCH) 185

      Stanislav Zimic. El teatro de Cervantes.
      (ELLEN M. ANDERSON) 188


CORRECTION 192


16.3 (1996) 17.2 (1997)
Fred Jehle jehle@ipfw.edu Publications of the CSA HCervantes
URL: http://www.h-net.org/~cervantes/csa/bcsas97.htm