Table of Contents 10.2 (1990)   11.2 (1991) ISSN 1943-3840

Cervantes


VOLUME XI, NUMBER 1 SPRING, 1991


Cover Graphic

Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America


Cervantes

Bulletin of the CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA


THE CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

President
JAVIER HERRERO (1991)

Vice President
RUTH EL SAFFAR (1991)

Secretary-Treasurer
ALISON WEBER (1991)

Executive Council

MARY M. GAYLORD PC ANTHONY CASCARDI
PETER DUNN SW DIANA WILSON
CARROLL B. JOHNSON MW MARY COZAD
HELENA PERCAS DE PONSETI SE DANIEL EISENBERG
ELIAS L. RIVERS NE THOMAS LATHROP/
  DOMINIC FINELLO

Cervantes: Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of  America

Editor: MICHAEL MCGAHA

Book Review Editor: EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN

Editor's Advisory Council

JUAN BAUTISTA AVALLE-ARCE     EDWARD C. RILEY
JEAN CANAVAGGIO ALBERTO SÁNCHEZ

Associate Editors

JOHN J. ALLEN     LUIS MURILLO
PETER DUNN LOWRY NELSON, JR.
RUTH EL SAFFAR HELENA PERCAS DE PONSETI
ROBERT M. FLORES GEOFFREY L. STAGG
EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN BRUCE W. WARDROPPER
CARROLL B. JOHNSON FRANCISCO MÁRQUEZ VILLANUEVA

Cervantes, official organ of the Cervantes Society of America, publishes scholarly articles in English and Spanish on Cervantes' life and works, reviews, and notes of interest to cervantistas. Twice yearly. Subscription to Cervantes is a part of membership in the Cervantes Society of America, which also publishes a Newsletter. $17.00 a year for individuals, $20.00 for institutions, $28.00 for couples, and $9.00 for students. Membership is open to all persons interested in Cervantes. For membership and subscription, send check in dollars to Professor ALISON WEBER, Secretary-Treasurer, The Cervantes Society of America, Department of Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903. Manuscripts should be sent in duplicate, together with a self-addressed envelope and return postage, to Professor MICHAEL MCGAHA, Editor, Cervantes, Department of Modern Languages, Pomona College, Claremont, California 91711-6333. The SOCIETY requires anonymous submissions, therefore the author's name should not appear on the manuscript; instead, a cover sheet with the author's name, address, and the title of the article should accompany the article. References to the author's own work should be couched in the third person. Books for review should be sent to Professor EDWARD FRIEDMAN, Book Review Editor, Cervantes, Dept. of Spanish and Portuguese, Ballantine Hall, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405.

Copyright © 1991 by the Cervantes Society of America.



Cervantes
VOLUME XI, NUMBER 1
TABLE OF CONTENTS


ARTICLES
      La memoria y el Quijote
      AURORA EGIDO

3

      In Don Quixote Cervantes draws upon the classical tradition according to which melancholy, prevalent in old age, had a positive effect upon memory and imagination. Don Quixote's memory of his readings feeds his fantasy, taking precedence over sense perception. His memory, like his imitation of models, is selective; he recalls the aspects of his reading most appropriate to the occasion and attempts to reenact them. Solitude stimulates Don Quixote's memory and imagination. He occasionally makes use of the techniques of artificial memory (composition of place, etc.) which were so popular in the Renaissance, but these also come in for their share of ridicule and are shown to be far less interesting than spontaneous, natural memory, which is constantly suffering the distortions brought about by imagination and experience. Thus Cervantes displaces the novel's focus from the allegorical to the psychological. In the 1615 Second Part Cervantes achieves prodigious effects by bringing into play not only Don Quixote's memory but those of the narrator, the other characters, and the reader. The Second Part also emphasizes the contrast between collective and individual memory, between the imitation of models and the impulse towards originality. Memory without imagination is worthless.

      The Waverly Series and Don Quixote: Manuscripts Found and Lost
      PATRICIA S. GASTON

45

      La influencia de Cervantes en los héroes de las novelas de Sir Walter Scott ha sido comentada frecuentemente por los críticos de ambos escritores; pero se ha pasado por alto el hecho de que el Quijote también le sirvió a Scott como modelo narrativo. Del Quijote tomó los motivos del viaje y de la venta, del manuscrito hallado, y también la estrategia de la textualidad autoconsciente. Estas técnicas contribuyen de manera importante a la relación entre historia y ficción en las novelas históricas de Scott.

      Cervantes and the Novelization of Drama: Tradition and Innovation in the Entremeses
      CORY A. REED

61

      Este estudio examina, desde una perspectiva teórica, los entremeses de Cervantes a partir de los elementos novelísticos que les dan su carácter original y único. Debido a la fuerte presencia en estas obras de una profundidad temática, la interiorización de personajes, la sátira, y el comentario social, los entremeses cervantinos pertenecen a lo que Mijail Bajtin ha llamado “drama novelizado,” y rechazan las convenciones teatrales del teatro menor de la época. Uno de los rasgos principales de tal novelización es la irresolución temática y estructural que demanda la colaboración del espectador o lector para resolver un tema principal o una acción abierta. Por lo tanto, la irresolución novelística se puede entender como una de las causas principales del fracaso de estos entremeses como obras teatrales y su éxito como textos literarios.

      Para una lectura psicológica de los cuentecillos de locos del segundo Don Quijote
      MAURICIO MOLHO

87

      While a psychological interpretation can never explain a text, it can help us to identify the anguish that triggered the writing of the text. The three stories of madmen in the prologue and in Chapter One of the 1615 Quijote are all examples of schizophrenia, illustrating two fundamental characteristics of that disorder: (1) the schizophrenic finds it extraordinarily difficult to adapt to change, because he identifies completely with his environment and finds a way to control or master it: and (2) the schizophrenic is almost entirely incapable of associating the representation of a word with the representation of a thing. The madman who thinks he is Neptune is unconsciously unwilling to leave the asylum, because he has identified completely with his environment and with the role he plays in it. The two stories of madmen and dogs in the prologue are both based on a schizophrenic's literal interpretation of figurative language. These two madmen identify not with their physical surroundings but with their peculiar relationship with dogs. The madman of Seville (the one who inflated dogs) represents Cervantes himself, while the madman of Cordova (who dropped stones on dogs, and later wrongly considered all dogs pointers) represents Avellaneda.


NOTES
      The second edition of Thomas Shelton's Don Quixote, Part I: A reassessment of the dating problem
      A. G. LO RÉ 99

      ¿Dónde queda la espada mágica de don Quijote?
      ALFRED RODRIGUEZ AND MARIE M. SMELOFF 119

      Eminescu and the Romantic Interpretation of Don Quijote
      DOMNICA RADULESCU 125


REVIEW
      Bryant L. Creel. Don Quijote, Symbol of a Culture in Crisis
      (HELENA PERCAS DE PONSETI) 135


Prepared with the help of Sue Dirrim
10.2 (1990) 11.2 (1991)
Fred Jehle jehle@ipfw.edu Publications of the CSA HCervantes
URL: http://www.h-net.org/~cervantes/csa/bcsas91.htm