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Impact of the Slave Trade on Africa


>>> Item number 662, dated 95/10/09 20:38:16 -- ALL

Date:         Mon, 9 Oct 1995 20:38:16 GMT-5
Reply-To:     H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
Sender:       H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
From:         H-AFRICA---Mel Page <AFRICA@ETSUARTS.EAST-TENN-ST.EDU>
Organization: East Tennessee State University
Subject:      QUERY: Impact of Slave Trade on Africa

crossposted from H-WORLD (h-world@msu.edu)

From:           Richard H. Robbins, SUNY-Plattsburgh
                (Robbinrh.splava.cc.plattsburgh.edu)
Date sent:      9-OCT-1995

Can anyone recommend a work that addresses the impact of slavery on the economic development of Africa? More specifically, did the loss of adult men and women to slavery significantly affect local economies by either depriving communities of workers, or significantly reducing demand for products?
Thanks!


                Editor's Notes:
                Readers who did not see the discussion
                thread on H-AFRICA concerning Goree
                and the Atlantic Slave Trade, which
                touched in some cases on this issue,
                may look to the listserv archives for
                postings from the first two or three
                weeks in August.

                To do this, send a message to:
                    listserv@msu.edu
                with no subject and only these three
                lines of text:
                    get h-africa log9508A
                    get h-africa log9508B
                    get h-africa log9508C
                You will then receive three messages,
                each rather long, with one week of
                postings to H-AFRICA; you will need to
                search through each for the items on
                Goree and the Atlantic Slave Trade.
                                            mep
                ***************************************

>>> Item number 663, dated 95/10/09 20:42:06 -- ALL

Date:         Mon, 9 Oct 1995 20:42:06 GMT-5
Reply-To:     H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
Sender:       H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
From:         H-AFRICA---Mel Page <AFRICA@ETSUARTS.EAST-TENN-ST.EDU>
Organization: East Tennessee State University
Subject:      REPLY:  Impact of Slave Trade on Africa

crossposted from H-WORLD (h-world@msu.edu)

From:           Jack Owens, Idaho State University
                <owenjack@isu.edu>
Date:           9 Oct 1995

On the early period of the Atlantic slave trade, I would recommend John Thornton, *Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1400-1680* (Cambridge Univ. Pr., 1992) not only because his own arguments are interesting but also because he does a good job of summarizing the state of the debate. In a recent number of *Africa in History* (vol. 19?), there was a debate over economic history and the slave trade that focused on Thornton's work.

I hope that this helps.

>>> Item number 665, dated 95/10/09 20:59:16 -- ALL

Date:         Mon, 9 Oct 1995 20:59:16 GMT-5
Reply-To:     H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
Sender:       H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
From:         H-AFRICA---Mel Page <AFRICA@ETSUARTS.EAST-TENN-ST.EDU>
Organization: East Tennessee State University
Subject:      QUERY: Impact of Slave Trade on Africa

                ***********************************
                Editor's Note,
                Thanks to H-Net Executive Director
                Richard Jensen for his quick
                response and this suggestion. Now
                H-AFRICA readers will learn
                something new at the same time as
                your editors!
                                            mep
                ***********************************
Date sent:      Mon, 09 Oct 1995
From:           Richard Jensen, H-Net Central
                <CAMPBELLD@LYNX.APSU.EDU>

The easy way to search the H-AFRICA logs for the Goree thread (or any other thread) is to use a search routine. Copy the follwing lines exactly, and mail to

LISTSERV@msu.edu
In a few minutes you will get all the messages (between Aug 1 1995 and Oct 9, 1995) containing the word "GOREE". You can change the search word from GOREE to anything else you want, and you can change the dates.

-------start here--do not send this line------ //ListSrch JOB Echo=no
Database Search DD=Rules
//Rules DD *
Search Goree in H-Africa from 1 aug 95 to 9 oct 95 index date.8 sender.30 subject.40 from print
--------end here---do not send this line-------

>>> Item number 666, dated 95/10/09 21:03:48 -- ALL

Date:         Mon, 9 Oct 1995 21:03:48 GMT-5
Reply-To:     H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
Sender:       H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
From:         H-AFRICA---Mel Page <AFRICA@ETSUARTS.EAST-TENN-ST.EDU>
Organization: East Tennessee State University
Subject:      REPLY: Impact of Slave Trade on Africa

Date sent:      Mon, 9 Oct 1995
From:           Martin Klein, University of Toronto
                <mklein@epas.utoronto.ca>

I think we have stressed the loss of person in the export of people too much. The slave trade also effected the quality of life within Africa by encouraging war, and by doing so, influenced reproduction. of people too much. The slave trade also effected the quality of life within Africa by encouraging war, and by doing so, influenced reproduction.

I have an article in Stanley and Engerman and Joseph Inikori (eds.), *The Atlantic Slave Trade. Effects on Economies, Societies and Peoples*. You might also look at Patrick Manning, *Slavery and African Life*, and Paul Lovejoy, *Transformations in Slavery*. All three of us have bilbiographies.

If you read French, look at Bazin and Terray, *Guerres de Lignages, Guerres d'Etat*.

Martin A. Klein


Department of History               mklein@epas.utoronto.ca
University of Toronto               office 416-978-8284
Toronto, Ontario  M5S 1A1           home 416-961-3055
                        fax 416-978-4810

>>> Item number 667, dated 95/10/09 21:12:23 -- ALL

Date:         Mon, 9 Oct 1995 21:12:23 GMT-5
Reply-To:     H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
Sender:       H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
From:         H-AFRICA---Mel Page <AFRICA@ETSUARTS.EAST-TENN-ST.EDU>
Organization: East Tennessee State University
Subject:      REPLY: Impact of Slave Trade on Africa

From:           Jose C. Curto, McGill University
                <JCURTO@FACL.Lan.McGill.CA>
Date:           9 Oct 1995

This one should be fun.

Before going on to Thornton's *Africa and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World*, I would suggest the following.

Start with Walter Rodney's *History of the Upper Guinea Coast*, to be followed by his *How Europe Underdeveloped Africa*.

Then go into John Fage's "Slavery and the slave trade in the context of West African History," *Journal of African History*. Vol. 10, 1969, pp. 393-404, supplented by his "The effect of the slave trade on African Population," in Rathbone and Moss, *The Population Factor in African Studies*, PP. 15-23.

Follow this up with the work of Joseph Inokori, particularly the "introduction" in his *Forced Migration: The Impact of the Export Slave Trade on African Societies*, and the work of Patrick Manning (a good summary of which is found in his relatively recent book - sorry, don't have the title at hand.

Also, look up the various pertinent titles in *African Historical Demography*, Vols. 1 and 2.

Finally, the whole debate on the impact of the AST is thoroughly analyzed and dissected in J.C. Curto "Historical Demography and the Effects of the Slave Trade in Africa: An Analysis of the Major Quantitative Studies," Center for Developing-Area Studies, Discussion paper no. 77, McGill University, 1992.

>>> Item number 668, dated 95/10/10 15:21:54 -- ALL

Date:         Tue, 10 Oct 1995 15:21:54 GMT-5
Reply-To:     H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
Sender:       H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
From:         H-AFRICA---Mel Page <AFRICA@ETSUARTS.EAST-TENN-ST.EDU>
Organization: East Tennessee State University
Subject:      REPLY: Impact of Slave Trade on Africa

crossposted from H-WORLD (h-world@msu.edu)

From:           DP Gutelius, Johns Hopkins Univ.
                <WWCEM252@SIVM.SI.EDU>
Date:           Tues, 10 Oct 1995

In heartily concurring with previous recommendations, I might add a few more:

Law, Robin, *The Slave Coast of West Africa, 1550-1750: The Impact

of the Atlantic Slave Trade on an African Society* (Oxford, 1991).

Lovejoy, Paul E., *Transformations in Slavery* (Cambridge, 1983)

also, see his article "The Impact of the Atlantic Slave Trade on Africa: A Review of the Literature," *Journal of African History 30(1989): 365- 394

Manning, Patrick, *Slavery and African Life: Occidental, Oriental, and

African Slave Trades* (Cambridge, 1990)

Fage's classic article in the 1969 issue of the *JAH* still holds

water today:"Slavery and the Slave Trade in the Context of West African History" 10:pp. 393- 404.

Bathily, Abdulaye, "La traite Atlantique des esclaves et ses effets economiques

et sociaux en Afrique: la cas du Galam, royaume de l'hinterland senegambien aux dix-huitieme siecle," *JAH* 27:pp. 269-293.

Boulegue, Jean, *Les Anciens Royaumes Wolof* (Karthala, 1987)

You might do well to check out the first chapters of Phil Curtin's

*Cross-cultural Trade in World History* (Cambridge, 1994)

Happy Reading!

>>> Item number 669, dated 95/10/12 08:24:53 -- ALL

Date:         Thu, 12 Oct 1995 08:24:53 GMT-5
Reply-To:     H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
Sender:       H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
From:         H-AFRICA---Mel Page <AFRICA@ETSUARTS.EAST-TENN-ST.EDU>
Organization: East Tennessee State University
Subject:      REPLY: Impact of Slave Trade on Africa

Date sent:      Tue, 10 Oct 1995
From:           Ralph Austen, University of Chicago
                <wwb3@midway.uchicago.edu>

This is a very controversial issue, to say the least. A good start is Patrick Manning, *Slavery and African Life* and J. Inikori, "Ideology vs. ...Paradigm...", *African Economic History*, 22 (1994), 37-58.

>>> Item number 670, dated 95/10/12 08:33:15 -- ALL

Date:         Thu, 12 Oct 1995 08:33:15 GMT-5
Reply-To:     H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
Sender:       H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
From:         H-AFRICA---Mel Page <AFRICA@ETSUARTS.EAST-TENN-ST.EDU>
Organization: East Tennessee State University
Subject:      REPLY: Impact of Slave Trade on Africa

Date sent:      Tue, 10 Oct 95
From:           Pier M. Larson
                <PML9@PSUVM.PSU.EDU>

I would push Martin Klein's point about overemphasis on demography and the slave trade further to note that there is much that is dissatisfying with the nevertheless appreciated research which has so far been conducted on the "impact" of the slave trade on Africa. There is too much interest in what Engerman and Inikori in the introduction to their recently published compendium call "the gainers and the losers." Zero sum paradigms are too restrictive and don't do justice to the range of transformations which the making and delivery of slaves confronted Africans and their leaders with.

I like to think of the era of the Slave trade as akin in impact to Europe's industrial revolution, which we understand very badly if we stick merely to demographic transition and economic development. Among other transformations, there are profound cultural creations and adjustments which have hardly been examined (I am not referring to slavery and culture, upon which there has been increasing interest of late, but to broader cultural developments at the heart of "free" societies). John Janzen's book *Lemba* is but a small scratch at this surface, I believe, but it is indicative of the kind of work which is still to be done.

I have recently been considering the cultural "aftermath" of the slave trade from central Madagascar to the Mascarenes. It is striking in this case how communities of identity were reshaped as descent groups and their kings fought over who might be enslaved for export purposes and debated the virtues of such enslavements. The solutions proposed by successful kings in the climate of popular ferment during the slave trade in central Madagascar were largely cultural ones.

The slave trade is still a broad field; problem is, given the sparsity and partiality of evidence generally available in comparison to the twentieth century, many young scholars are chosing the later over the former. I think we need a revival in this area, and a revaluing of social history of earlier periods worked with documentation that remains unsatisfying by twentieth century standards.
From LISTSERV@MSU.EDU Fri May 24 10:01:38 1996 Date: Fri, 24 May 1996 09:44:55 -0400
From: "L-Soft list server at Michigan State University (1.8b)"

<LISTSERV@MSU.EDU>
To: africa@H-NET.MSU.EDU
Subject: File: "DATABASE OUTPUT"

> Search Effect of Slave Trade in h-africa --> Database H-AFRICA, 18 hits.

> Print 672
>>> Item number 672, dated 95/10/12 08:47:18 -- ALL

Date:         Thu, 12 Oct 1995 08:47:18 GMT-5
Reply-To:     H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
Sender:       H-NET List for African History <H-AFRICA@MSU.EDU>
From:         H-AFRICA---Mel Page <AFRICA@ETSUARTS.EAST-TENN-ST.EDU>
Organization: East Tennessee State University
Subject:      REPLY: Effect of Slave Trade on Africa

crossposted from H-WORLD (h-world@msu.edu)

From:           Randy Head, UC Riverside
                <randolph.head@ucr.edu>

Check the section entitled "Slave trade: Effect of external trade on Africa" in Joseph Miller's *Slavery and Slavery in World History: A Bibliography, 1900-1991*. There are nearly a hundred verified entries for articles and books specifically on this topic.

I worked as a research assistant on this volume, and recommend it highly for anyone interested in bibliographical information, arranged and indexed in a reasonably accessible fashion, on all aspects of slavery in historiographical literature.


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