POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Wabash College

PS 4/ECON 14

SPRING 1997

MATT DAVIES


Office: Baxter 205
Phone: 361-6031
email: jmdavies@ix.netcom.com
Office hours: MWF 3:30-4:00, Tu Th 11:30-12:30

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will provide an introduction to some of the political and economic problems of the developing or "Third World." We will discuss some of the reasons that some countries may be less developed, some of the obstacles to development, and some of the policies that are being used to address these problems. Development is a term which is difficult to define, and in keeping with the multidisciplinary structure of the course, we will be approaching the problems of development from not only political or economic starting points, but also from cultural and ethical points of view.

COURSE GOALS

  1. To examine some of the political and economic problems affecting the so-called "Third World."
  2. To probe some of the international, supranational, or transnational institutions and forces affecting development.
  3. To critique some of the common prejudices and ideas about the developing countries.

TEXTS

(1) United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Information and Policy Analysis. World Social Situation in the 1990s.

(2) Bjoumlrn Hettne. Development Theory and the Three Worlds: Towards and International Political Economy of Development, second edition. (Hettne)

(3) Rajani Kanth. Paradigms in Economic Development: Classic Perspectives, Critiques, and Reflections. (Kanth)

(4) Martha Nussbaum and Jonathan Glover, eds. Women, Culture and Development: A Study of Human Capabilities. (Nussbaum and Glover).

Other assigned readings will be available at the Reserve Desk at Lilly Library.

EVALUATION

This course is organized as a seminar, so your attendance and participation in class discussions is required and given a proportionally heavy weight in your final grade. A comprehensive, take-home final exam and three short written exercises will make up the remainder of your grade. The written exercises will be explained and assigned in class. Your grades will be weighted thus:

Participation: 20%

Review essay: 20%

Concept paper: 20%

Country study: 20%

Final exam: 20%

ASSIGNED READINGS

Week 1

January 15: COURSE INTRODUCTION

I. PROBLEMS OF "UNDERDEVELOPMENT"

January 17: World Social Situation in the 1990s (WSS), "Introduction"; Hettne, "The Research Territory."

Week 2

January 20: WSS, "Income Distribution and Inequality" (chapter 2) and "Unemployment and Low Productivity Employment" (chapter 3).

January 22: WSS, "Poverty" (chapter 4).

II. HISTORY OF A CONCEPT: THE DEVELOPMENT OF DEVELOPMENT THINKING

  1. Modernization, Dependency, and the NIEO

January 24: Hettne, chapter 1. (Optional: Kanth, Introduction; and Gustavo Esteva, "Development," in Wolfgang Sachs, ed., The Development Dictionary, on reserve).

Week 3

January 27: H. Myint, "An Interpretation of Economic Backwardness" (in Kanth).

January 29: W. W. Rostow, "The Five Stages-of-Growth -- A Summary"; and A. Gerschenkron, "Reflections on the Concept of 'Prerequisites' of Modern Industrialization" (both in Kanth).

January 31: Hettne, chapter 2.

Week 4

February 3: P. Baran, "On the Roots of Backwardness"; and A. G. Frank, "The Development of Underdevelopment" (both in Kanth).

February 5: S. Amin, "The Origin and Development of Underdevelopment"; R. Prebisch, "The Latin American Periphery in the Global System of Capitalism"; and J. Banaji, "For a Theory of Colonial Modes of Production" (all in Kanth).

February 7: Hettne, chapter 3.

B. Crisis in Development and in Theory

Week 5

February 10: Cheryl Payer, "Causes of the Debt Crisis" (on reserve); and A. Hirschman, "The Rise and Decline of Development Economics" (in Kanth).

III. STRATEGIES FOR OVERCOMING THE CRISIS

  1. Neoliberalism and Market Oriented Reforms

February 12: Eduardo A. Gamarra, "Market Oriented Reforms and Democratization in Latin America: Challenges of the 1990s" and Geacuterald Berthoud, "Market" (in Sachs -- both on reserve); and D. Lal, "The Misconceptions of 'Development Economics'" (in Kanth).

February 14: Manuel Castells and Alejandro Portes, "World Underneath: The Origins, Dynamics and Effects of the Informal Economy" (on reserve); and
"http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fiatlux/td/ofelia/oc-eng.html" Vera Britto, Interview with Ofelia Calcetas-Santos (all the Vera Britto interviews are located at
http://www.personal.umich.edu/~fiatlux/td/).

B. NICs and Emerging Markets in Southeast Asia

Week 6

February 17: Yun-han Chu, "The East Asian NICs: A State-led Path to the Developed World" (on reserve); and "http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fiatlux/td/stef/ss-eng.html Vera Britto, Interview with Stephanie Seguino.

February 19: Linda Y. C. Lim, "Southeast Asia: Success Through International Openness" (on reserve).

C. International Aid: The World Bank

February 21: World Development Report 1994, Infrastructure for Development, "Overview" (pp. 1-12) (on reserve).

Week 7

February 24: Marianne Gronemayer, "Helping" (in Sachs); and NACLA Report on the Americas, "Rhetoric and Reality: The World Bank's New Concern for the Poor" (both on reserve).

D. Sustainable Development

February 26: Hettne, chapter 4; and
"http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fiatlux/td/renno/cr-eng.html" Vera Britto, Interview with Catherine Renno.

February 28: Steven Arnold and Kelly Rae Reineke, "Responsibilities without Resources: Dilemmas of the 'Grassroots Manager'" Grassroots Development vol. 20, no 1 (1996); and Kevin Healy, "La Khochalita's Export Saga" Grassroots Development vol. 20, no. 2 (1996) (both on reserve).

IV. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, BASIC NEEDS, AND SOCIAL SERVICES

Week 8

March 3: WSS, "Population Growth, Urbanization, Migration and Refugees" (chapter 5) and "Hunger, Malnutrition, and Food Supplies" (chapter 6).

March 5: Ben Fine, "Toward a Political Economy of Food" (on reserve).

March 7: WSS, "Health" (chapter 7) and "Education and Literacy" (chapter 8);
"http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fiatlux/td/eccher/ce-eng.html" Vera Britto, Interview with Celita Eccher.

SPRING BREAK, MARCH 8-16

Week 9

March 17: WSS, "Housing and Sanitation" (chapter 9) and "Social Security" (chapter 10).

March 19: WSS, "Quality of Life" (chapter 11); and Paulo Seacutergio Pinheiro, "Democracies Without Citizenship" (on reserve).

V. ETHICS AND DEVELOPMENT: GENDER ISSUES

March 21: Martha C. Nussbaum, "Introduction"; and Martha Chen, "A Matter of Survival: Women's Right to Employment in India and Bangladesh" (both in Nussbaum and Glover).

Week 10

March 24: Martha C. Nussbaum, "Human Capabilities, Female Human Beings" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

March 26: Commentator: Susan Wolf (in Nussbaum and Glover); "http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fiatlux/td/elliot/ce-eng.html" Vera Britto, Interview with Carolyn Elliot.

March 28: Jonathan Glover, "The Research Programme of Development Ethics" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

Week 11

March 31: David A. Crocker: "Functioning and Capability: The Foundations of Sen's and Nussbaum's Development Ethic" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

April 2: Seyla Benhabib, "Cultural Complexity, Moral Interdependence, and the Global Dialogical Community" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

April 4: Amartya Sen, "Global Inequality and Theories of Justice" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

Week 12<

April 7: Susan Moller Okin, "Inequalities Between the Sexes in Different Cultural Contexts" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

April 9: Xiaorong Li, "Gender Inequality in China and Cultural Relativism" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

April 11: Margarita M. Valdeacutes, "Inequality in Capabilities Between Men and Women in Mexico" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

Week 13

April 14: Roop Rekha Verma, "Femininity, Equality, and Personhood" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

April 16: Nkiru Negwu, "Recovering Igbo Traditions: A Case for Indigenous Women's Organizations in Development" (in Nussbaum and Glover).

EMERGING ISSUES AND FUTURE TRENDS

April 18: WSS, "Public Institutions" (chapter 12) and "Ethnic Conflicts and National Disintegration" (chapter 13); and Nina Pacari, "Ecuador: Taking On the Neoliberal Agenda" (on reserve).

Week 14

April 21: WSS, "Social Consequences of Advances in Technology" (chapter 14); Gerald Sussman, "The Transnationalization of Philippine Telecommunications: Postcolonial Continuities" (on reserve), and
"http://www-personal.umich.edu/~fiatlux/td/vandana/vs-eng.html" era Britto, Interview with Vandana Shiva.

April 23: Folu Ogandimu, "Communicating Knowledge of Immunization for Development: A Case Study from Nigeria"; and Penina Mlama, "Reinforcing Existing Indigenous Communication Skills: The Use of Dance in Tanzania" (both on reserve).

April 25: Hettne, chapter 5.

Week 15

April 28: Hettne, chapter 6.

April 30: Amartya Sen, "Development: Which Way Now?" and Vandana Shiva, "Development, Ecology, and Women" (both in Kanth).

May 2: Medea Benjamin, "Interview: Subcomandante Marcos" (on reserve).

FINAL EXAM DATE TO BE ANNOUNCED

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