Introduction to City and Regional Planning
City and Regional Planning 310 (4 credits)

Katrin Anacker
anacker.2@osu.edu
Ohio State University
City and Regional Planning
Knowlton School of Architecture
Columbus, Ohio, USA


Spring 2004

SYLLABUS
Course Description | Class Requirements | Books | Grading | Class Schedule


COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course is designed to help students explore the fundamental concepts of city and regional planning, including various planning tools and social and political issues of planning. A wide variety of topics will be discussed, including physical planning, transportation, housing, land use, urban development, and preservation. Class time will be devoted to lectures, guest lectures, class discussions, group discussions, role playing and movies.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
At the conclusion of this course, students should be able to:

  • understand the general concepts of city and regional planning and their various uses
  • understand issues specific to selected aspects of city and regional planning
  • enumerate selected methods of analysis used in city and regional planning
  • enumerate selected tools of city and regional planning
  • discuss pertinent (sub)urban issues in an educated manner
  • discuss Federal, state, and local policy in an educated manner

CLASS WEBSITE
This class uses Web Course Tools (WebCT) in order to enhance the online learning experience of students. This website contains several reading assignments, a discussion board, a course calendar, and other pertinent information. Please go to http://class.osu.edu/. Instructions on how to log in can be found under http://class.osu.edu/index1.html.


COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Class Attendance/Participation/Behavior
Students are expected and required to attend class regularly and to participate in discussions. Students are expected to arrive on time and to shut off their cell phones before the beginning of class. The instructor reserves the right to exclude students from the class for inappropriate behavior.

Reading Assignments
Students are expected and required to familiarize themselves with and understand the class readings before each class. Readings will be discussed in groups and during class time.

Homework Assignments
Most classes will have a guest speaker during the first half of the class. Students are required to read the assigned readings before class. Based on these readings students are required to submit three educated questions that they could ask the guest speaker after his or her presentation. An educated question is characterized by a careful and insightful analysis of an issue. All submitted questions are worth 25 percent of the course grade.

Group Discussions
Group discussions will be conducted during class time. Group membership will be assigned randomly each time when there is a group discussion scheduled. Groups are required to select a spokesperson and a recorder for the group. After the end of the group discussion the recorder is required to turn in three educated findings of the group to the instructor. Bullet points are encouraged. Then the spokesperson will present the findings to the class. An educated finding is characterized by a careful and insightful analysis of an issue. The spokesperson is required to present the three educated findings of the group during the class discussion. Recorded results of all group discussions in class are worth 10 percent of the course grade.

Book Report
Book reports are expected to be professional (checked for spelling, grammatical errors, fluidness of composition, etc.). Please use 1.5 space, 12 point font, 1” margins at the top and at the bottom, 1.25” margins on the left and on the right. Please insert page numbers and staple multiple pages together. Your name should be on the first page. Printing on both sides of the page is encouraged but not required. The assignment is discussed in more detail under Week 7 (May 12th). The book report is worth 15 percent of the course grade

Exams
There are a midterm and a final in this class, both of which are two multiple-choice exams. The final is not comprehensive. Each exam worth 25 percent of the course grade.


GRADING
Grades for this class will be based on the following work:   Final grades will be assigned based on the following scale:
25% Homework Assignments  

A   95.00 - 100.00 points total
A-  90.00 - 94.99 points total
B+ 85.00 - 89.99 points total
B   80.00 - 84.99 points total
B-  75.00 - 79.99 points total
C+ 70.00 - 74.99 points total
C   65.00 - 69.99 points total
C-  60.00 - 64.99 points total
D+ 55.00 - 59.99 points total
D   50.00 - 54.99 points total
F    below 49.99 points total

10% In-Class Group Work Results
25% Midterm
15% Book Report
25% Final
100% Total

Assignment Submission, Late or Missing Assignments
The book reports needs to be submitted on paper. The book report is due on May 12th at 6:30 pm sharp. Assignments that were handed in after 6:30 pm on that day are considered late. Students will lose 10 percent per day, starting from 6:30 pm the day the assignment is due. Late assignments are only accepted until the beginning of the next class period. Students may submit late assignments to the instructor's mailbox in Brown Hall 131 (if the office is not open during office hours please request help in Brown Hall 109). Students may also submit late assignments by sliding them under the instructor's office door in Brown Hall 378d.

All homework assignments need to be submitted questions via e-mail. These assignments are very time critical, as specified below. Students will lose 10 percent per hour, starting from the specified time. Late assignments are only accepted until ten hours after the assignment was due. Late or missing assignments or exams may be made up by presenting a valid written doctor's excuse or a valid obituary or funeral home card within one week of the deadline or exam date. No make-up assignments or exams will be given without a valid written doctor's excuse or a valid obituary or funeral home card. Computer trouble will not be accepted as an apology for late or missing assignments. A list of all OSU computer centers and locations can be found under http://sccweb.it.ohio-state.edu/web_development/public/map.html (students may want to print out this list ahead of time).

Academic Misconduct
Academic misconduct of any kind will not be tolerated or permitted. All students will be held responsible for following and abiding by the University's policy on academic misconduct. The Ohio State University Code of Student Conduct handbook (Chapter 3335-23-04) provides a detailed description of the University's policy on academic misconduct. Copies may be obtained on the web at http://studentaffairs.osu.edu/resource_csc.asp

Disability Statement
Any student who feels he or she may need an accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately to discuss his or her specific needs. Please contact the Office for Disability Services at 614.292.3307 in 150 Pomerene Hall to coordinate reasonable accommodations in case of documented disabilities.

 

REQUIRED READING
(available at Long's Bookstore, OSU Bookstore, SBX, and UBX)

J. Barry Cullingworth and Roger W. Caves Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and
Processes
(New York et al., 2003).

Alex Kotlowitz The Other Side of the River: A Story of Two Towns, a Death, and
America's Dilemma
(New York, 1998).

Other class readings are on the WebCT website under http://class.osu.edu.



COURSE SCHEDULE
Class Topics, Activities, Readings and Assignments
Week 1 | Week 2 | Week 3 | Week 4 | Week 5 | Week 6 | Week 7 | Week 8 | Week 9 | Week 10

Week 1 - March 30

Course introduction, OIE introduction
Discussion: What are the major crises and hidden challenges facing US cities? German cities?
Turn in a list in order of which subtopic you would like to work on – list by title of the subtopic (not by number). You can also tell me one or two that you really do not want to work on.

Topic: Introduction to City and Regional Planning
Introduction Round (30 minutes)
Introduction Syllabus and WebCT (30 minutes)
Lecture: What is Planning? What do Planners Do? (20 minutes)
Introduction Group Activity (10 minutes)

Break – Walk to 161/178/181 Brown Hall (10 minutes)

Group Activity (161/178/181 Brown Hall): Neighborhood Analysis (45 minutes)
Class Discussion (161 Brown Hall): Neighborhood Analysis (20 minutes)

Reading Assignment for March 31st:
    J. Barry Cullingworth, and Roger W. Caves, Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and Processes (New York, 2003) 1-26 (Introduction, Chapter 1 – The Nature of Planning).

    Hazel A. Morrow-Jones, Edward J. Malecki, and Katrin B. Anacker,“Challenges of City Planning and City Development in the US: Current Situation and Prognosis,” Petermanns Geographische Mitteilungen 1, 148 (2004) 42-49 (available on WebCT).

Week 2 - April 7

Topic Area: Scale
Topic: Columbus Metropolitan Region

Guest Lecture and Class Discussion: Current Issues in Regional Planning
Guest Speaker: Kimberly Gibson, Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (60 minutes)

Break (10 minutes)

Reflection (10 minutes)
Class Business (10 minutes)
Lecture: There is Enough Land in the United States! Is There Really a Need for Growth Management Principles? (20 minutes)
Group Activity/Role Play: Columbus Urban Growth Boundary (60 minutes)

Reading Assignments for April 7th:
    J. Barry Cullingworth, and Roger W. Caves, Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and Processes (New York, 2003) 27-43, 109-123, 154-188. (Chapters 2, 7, 10, 11 – Urbanization, Development Charges, Growth Management and Local Government, and Urban Growth Management and the States).

    Shelley Coffman, “Controlling Growth, Supporting Services,” Columbus Monthly (March 2004) 23-26 (available on WebCT).

    Alex Kotlowitz, The Other Side of the River: A Story of Two Towns, a Death, and America's Dilemma (New York, 1998) 1-44.

    http://www.morpc.org/MORPC.htm
    http://www.regionalconnections.org/

Homework Assignment due April 6th, 6:00 pm (2.5% of grade)
Please read Cullingworth and Caves, and Coffman. Also, take a look at the websites mentioned above. Write down three educated questions questions that you would ask our guest speaker in a polite and diplomatic manner on April 7th. Submit these questions questions via e-mail by April 6th, 6:00 pm (e-mail message to anacker.2@osu.edu, no attachments, please).

Week 3 - April 14

Topic Area: Scale
Topic: Franklin County

Guest Lecture and Class Discussion: Cities in the Columbus Metropolitan Area vs. Townships: Water and Sewer Wars
Guest Speaker: Vincente Mantero, Ohio Capital Corporation for Housing (60 minutes)

Break (10 minutes)

Reflection (10 minutes)
Class Business (10 minutes)
Lecture: Zoning – the American Dream? (20 minutes)
Movie: “The View from Malabar” (2000) (55 minutes)

Reading Assignment for April 14th:
    J. Barry Cullingworth, and Roger W. Caves, Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and Processes (New York, 2003) 64-108 (Chapters 4, 5, 6 – The Evolution of Zoning and The Institutional and Legal Framework and The Techniques of Zoning).

    Jeff Long, “The Township: An Endangered Species,” Columbus Monthly (March 2001) 102-109 (available on WebCT).

    Alex Kotlowitz, The Other Side of the River: A Story of Two Towns, a Death, and America's Dilemma (New York, 1998) 45-148.

    http://www.co.franklin.oh.us/
    http://ohioline.osu.edu/cd-fact/1265.html

Homework Assignment due April 13th, 6:00 pm (2.5% of grade)
Please read Cullingworth and Caves, and Long. Also, please take a look at the websites mentioned above. Write down three educated questions questions that you would ask our guest speaker in a polite and diplomatic manner on April 14th. Submit these questions questions via e-mail by April 13th, 6:00 pm (e-mail message to anacker.2@osu.edu, no attachments, please).

Week 4 - April 21

Topic Area: Scale
Topic: Mature Suburbs

Guest Lecture and Class Discussion: Current Issues in Whitehall
Guest Speaker: Mayor Lynn Ochsendorf, City of Whitehall (60 minutes)

Break (10 minutes)

Reflection (10 minutes)
Class Business (10 minutes)
Movie: Ohio‘s First Suburbs: Rethinking New Investment Strategies for a More Competitive Ohio (2003) (20 minutes)
Group Discussion: “Ohio's First Suburbs” (20 minutes) (2.5% of grade)
Class Discussion: “Ohio's First Suburbs” (20 minutes)
Midterm Review Session (Lecture, Questions & Answers) (20 minutes)

Reading Assignment for April 21st:
    Myron Orfield, American Metropolitics: The New Suburban Reality (Washington, 2002) 23-48 (Chapter 2: The New Suburban Typology; available on WebCT).

    Myron Orfield, and Robert Puentes, Valuing America's First Suburbs: A Policy Agenda for Older Suburbs in the Midwest, Brookings Institution Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy Discussion Paper (Washington, 2002)
    http://www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/es/urban/firstsuburbs/firstsuburbs.pdf

    Thomas Bier, “Moving Up, Filtering Down: Metropolitan Housing Dynamics” Brookings Institution Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy Discussion Paper (September 2001)
    http://www.brookings.edu/dybdocroot/es/urban/publications/bier.pdf

    Alex Kotlowitz, The Other Side of the River: A Story of Two Towns, a Death, and America's Dilemma (New York, 1998) 149-234, 247-254.

    http://www.firstsuburbs.org/
    http://www.metroresearch.org
    http://www.metroresearch.org/maps/region_maps/1.30_Ohio%20Metropatterns.pdf
Homework Assignment due April 20th, 6:00 pm (2.5% of grade)
Please read Orfield, Orfield and Puentes, and Bier. Also, please take a look at the websites mentioned above. Write down three educated questions questions that you would ask our guest speaker in a polite and diplomatic manner on April 21st. Submit these questions questions via e-mail by April 20th, 6:00 pm (e-mail message to anacker.2@osu.edu, no attachments, please).

Week 5 - April 28

Topic Area: Selected Aspects of City and Regional Planning

Midterm (25% of grade) (45 minutes)

Break (15 minutes)

Class Business (10 minutes)
Lecture: Real Estate Property Flipping (20 minutes)
Group Discussion: Real Estate Property Flipping (20 minutes) (2.5% of grade)
Class Discussion: Real Estate Property Flipping (20 minutes)
Movie: “Predatory Lending” (2002) (15 minutes)

Reading Assignments for April 28th:

    J. Barry Cullingworth, and Roger W. Caves, Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and Processes (New York, 2003) 212-232 (Chapter 13 – Housing).

    Alex Kotlowitz, The Other Side of the River: A Story of Two Towns, a Death, and America's Dilemma (New York, 1998) 273-317.

Homework Assignment due April 27th, 6:00 pm (5% of grade)
Please submit three educated questions questions that you would like to see on the midterm. Submit these questions questions via e-mail by April 27th, 6:00 pm (e-mail message to anacker.2@osu.edu, no attachments, please).

Week 6 - May 5

Topic Area: Scale
Topic: Central Cities

Guest Lecture and Class Discussion: Planning in the Central Cities
Guest Speaker: Kevin Wheeler, MCRP, City of Columbus (60 minutes)

Break (10 minutes)

Reflection (10 minutes)
Class Business (10 minutes)
Lecture: Citizen Participation (20 minutes)
Group Discussion: Citizen Participation (20 minutes) (2.5% of grade)
Class Discussion: Citizen Participation (20 minutes)

Reading Assignments for May 5th:

    J. Barry Cullingworth, and Roger W. Caves, Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and Processes (New York, 2003) 44-62 (Chapter 3 – Governing and Planning Urban Areas).

    Henry L. Hunker, Columbus, Ohio: A Personal Geography (Columbus, 2000) 23-36 (Chapter 3 – Columbus: Situational Considerations; available on WebCT).

    Melville C. Branch, Comprehensive City Planning: Introduction & Explanation (Chicago, 1985) 73-86 (Chapter 6: Who Plans the City? available on WebCT)

    http://www.columbusinfobase.org
    http://ci.columbus.oh.us/

Homework Assignment due May 4th, 6:00 pm (2.5% of grade)
Please read Cullingworth and Caves, Hunker, and Branch. Also, please take a look at the websites mentioned above. Write down three educated questions questions that you would ask our guest speaker in a polite and diplomatic manner on May 5th. Submit these questions questions via e-mail by May 4th, 6:00 pm (e-mail message to anacker.2@osu.edu, no attachments, please).

Week 7 - May 12

Topic Area: Selected Areas of City and Regional Planning
Topic: Neotraditional Neighborhoods

Guest Lecture: Neotraditional Neighborhoods
Guest Speaker: Doug Ervin, Concorde Capital (60 minutes)

Break (10 minutes)

Reflection (10 minutes)
Class Business (10 minutes)
Lecture: Gated Communities (20 minutes)
Group Discussion: Gated Communities (20 minutes) (2.5% of grade)
Class Discussion: Gated Communities (20 minutes)
Movie: “America the Ugly” (1999) (20 minutes)

Reading/Listening Assignments for May 12th:
    J. Barry Cullingworth, and Roger W. Caves, Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and Processes (New York, 2003) 126-139 (Chapter 8 – Aesthetics).

    Andres Duany, Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk, and Jeff Speck, Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream (New York, 2000) 183-214 (Chapter 10: How to Make a Town; available on WebCT).

    Douglas Frantz, and Catherine Collins, Celebration, USA: Living in Disney's Brave New Town (New York, 1999) 13-36 (Chapter 1– The Cult of the Mouse; available on WebCT).

    http://discover.npr.org/features/feature.jhtml?wfId=1392317
    http://discover.npr.org/fatures/feature.jhtml?wfId=1147962

Homework Assignment due May 11th, 6:00 pm (2.5% of grade)
Please read Cullingworth and Caves, Duany, Plater-Zyberk, and Speck, and Frantz and Collins. Also, please take a look at the websites mentioned above and listen to the features. Write down three educated questions questions that you would ask our guest speaker in a polite and diplomatic manner on May 12th. Submit these questions questions via e-mail by May 11th, 6:00 pm (e-mail message to anacker.2@osu.edu, no attachments, please).

Book Report due May 12th, 6:30 pm sharp (15% of grade)
Please read Alex Kotlowitz's The Other Side of the River.

  1. Describe, compare and contrast Benton Harbor and St. Joseph in terms of their physical and socioeconomic characteristics. In addition, use at least three meaningful variables provided by the 1990 and the 2000 US Censuses (see class activity week 1).
  2. Describe the relationship between the residents of Benton Harbor and St. Joseph.
  3. What can planners/public policy analysts do in order to improve the situation of the neighborhood in physical and socioeconomic terms? (please be specific, realistic but nevertheless innovative)
  4. What can planners/public policy analysts do in order to improve the relationship between residents of Benton Harbor and St. Joseph? (please be specific, realistic but nevertheless innovative)
Maximum length: 5 pages.

Week 8 - May 19

Topic Area: Selected Aspects of City and Regional Planning
Topic: Universities as Real Estate Developers

Guest Lecture: Universities as Real Estate Developers
Guest Speaker: Doug Aschenbach, Campus Partners (60 minutes)

Break (10 minutes)

Reflection (10 minutes)
Class Business (10 minutes)
Movie: “Streets without Cars” (2000) (70 minutes)
Class Discussion: “Streets without Cars” (10 minutes)

Reading Assignments for May 19th:

    J. Barry Cullingworth, and Roger W. Caves, Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and Processes (New York, 2003) 140-152 (Chapter 9 – Historic Preservation).

    Jane Jacobs, The Death and Life of Great American Cities (New York, 1961) 55-73 (Chapter 3 – The Uses of Sidewalks: Contact; available on WebCT).

    Alexander Garvin, The American City: What Works, What Doesn't (New York, 2002) 177-194 (Chapter 7 – Planning for Pedestrians; available on WebCT).

    David Brooks, Bobos in Paradise: The New Upper Class and How They Got There (New York, 2000) 54-61, 75-102 (parts of Chapter 2 – Consumption; available on WebCT).

    http://www.streetswithoutcars.com
    http://campuspartners.osu.edu/

Homework Assignment due May 18th, 6:00 pm (2.5% of grade)
Please read Cullingworth and Caves, Jacobs, Garvin, and parts of Brooks. Also, please take a look at the websites given above. Write down three educated questions questions that you would ask our guest speaker in a polite and diplomatic manner on May 19th. Submit these questions questions via e-mail by May 18th, 6:00 pm (e-mail message to anacker.2@osu.edu, no attachments, please).

Week 9 - May 26

Topic Area: Selected Aspects of City and Regional Planning
Topic: Light Rail

Guest Lecture: COTA's Fast Trax Project
Guest Speaker: George Cook, Griffin Communications/COTA
(60 minutes)

Break (10 minutes)

Reflection (10 minutes)
Class Business (10 minutes)
Movie: “Taken for a Ride” (1996) (60 minutes)
Class Discussion: “Taken for a Ride” (20 minutes)

Reading Assignments for May 26th:

    J. Barry Cullingworth, and Roger W. Caves, Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and Processes (New York, 2003) 190-211 (Chapter 12 – Transportation).

    http://www.cotafasttrax.com/

Homework Assignment due May 25th, 6:00 pm (2.5% of grade)
Please read Cullingworth and Caves. Also, please take a look at the website mentioned above. Write down three educated questions questions that you would ask our guest speaker in a polite and diplomatic manner on May 26th. Submit these questions questions via e-mail by May 25th, 6:00 pm (e-mail message to anacker.2@osu.edu, no attachments, please).

Week 10 - June 2

Topic Area: Selected Aspects of City and Regional Planning
Topic: Keeping Downtown Competitive

Guest Lecture and Class Discussion: Sports Facilities and Downtown (Re)Development
Guest Speaker: Brian Ellis, Nationwide Realty Investors (60 minutes)

Break (10 minutes)

Reflection (10 minutes)
Class Business (10 minutes)

Conclusion of Class: What have we learned? (20 minutes)
Final Review Session (Lecture, Questions & Answers) (20 minutes)

Reading Assignments for June 2nd:
    J. Barry Cullingworth, and Roger W. Caves, Planning in the USA: Policies, Issues and Processes (New York, 2003) (Chapter 14 – Community and Economic Development).

    Jonathan Barnett, Redesigning Cities: Principles, Practice, Implementation (Chicago, 2003) 189-209 (Chapter 11 – Keeping Downtowns Competitive; available on WebCT).

    Andrew S. Zimbalist, May the Best Team Win: Baseball Economics and Public Policy (Washington, 2003) 123-133 (Chapter 6 – The Stadium Issue; available on WebCT).

    Aaron Marshall, “Arena Wars,” Columbus Monthly (December 2000) 42- 50 (available on WebCT).

    http://www.nationwidearena.com/arena/

Homework Assignment due June 1st, 6:00 pm (2.5% of grade)
Please read Cullingworth and Caves, Barnett, Zimbalist, and Marshall. Also, please take a look at the website mentioned above. Write down three educated questions questions that you would ask our guest speaker in a polite and diplomatic manner on June 2nd. Submit these questions questions via e-mail by June 1st, 6:00 pm (e-mail message, no attachments to anacker.2@osu.edu, please).

Week 11 -June 9

Final Exam @ 6:30 pm in Brown Hall 223


Syllabus prepared 12 October 2004 for H-Urban Teaching Center.
http://www.h-net.org/~urban/teach/index.htm

Syllabus copyright 2004 Katrin Anacker. All rights reserved.
Permission to copy and use under "fair use" in education is granted,
provided proper credit is given.

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