H-Net about    search    site map    editors    donate    contact    help
navbar
Discussion Networks Reviews Job Guide Announcements

H-Latam
General Information
  • Subscribe!
  • Subscription Help
  • Welcome Message
  • Editors
  • Advisory Board

    H-LatAm Resources

  • CLAH
  • Archives
  • Syllabi
  • Bibliographies
  • Book Stores
  • Blogs
  • Presentations
  • Journals
  • Essays Project
  • Discussion Threads
  • Table of Contents
  • Discussion Logs
  • H-LatAm Reviews
  • H-LatAm Links
  • Housing Info
  • Research Assistance

     Search H-Latam
     Enter keyword(s)
     
      Search all H-Net Logs

  • Title The Caribbean Basin to c.1800 (Ralph Woodward, Tulane)

     8/93                             HISTORY 678                                   
                                   Caribbean Basin I                                
                                                                                    
                                    COURSE OUTLINE                                  
    

    I. INSTRUCTOR Professor R. L. Woodward, Jr.

              Office:  Hebert 118.  Telephone:  (504)862-8616, FAX(504)862-8739     
              Office Hours: 9-11, MWF                                               
    

    II. REQUIRED READING:

         F. Knight, THE CARIBBEAN:  GENESIS OF A FRAGMENTED NATIONALISM, 2d ed.     
              (New York:  Oxford University Press, 1990).                           
         R. L. Woodward, CENTRAL AMERICA:  A NATION DIVIDED, 2d ed. (New York:      
              Oxford University Press, 1985).                                       
         S. Mintz, SWEETNESS & POWER: THE PLACE OF SUGAR IN MODERN HISTORY (New     
              York:  Penguin, 1985).                                                
         M. L. Wortman, GOVERNMENT AND SOCIETY IN CENTRAL AMERICA, 1680-1840 (New   
              York:  Columbia University Press, 1982).                              
         Thomas Gage, TRAVELS IN THE NEW WORLD (Norman:  University of Oklahoma     
              Press, 1958).                                                         
         RECOMMENDED, especially for graduate students, Murdo MacLeod, SPANISH      
              CENTRAL AMERICA (Berkeley:  University of California Press, 1973)     
              (out of print).                                                       
    

    III. LECTURE OUTLINE

    1. Introduction and Background.
    2. The Geography of the Caribbean Basin
    3. Indigenous Peoples.
    4. European Discovery and Exploration
    5. Spanish Colonization
    6. The Structure of Spanish Colonial Government in the Caribbean
    7. The Economic Structure of the Caribbean
    8. The Structure of Spanish Colonial Society
    9. The Beginnings of Plantation Society in the Caribbean
              MID-TERM EXAMINATION - Tuesday, 15 October 1991                       
                Read Knight, CARIBBEAN, pp. 1-119; Woodward, CENTRAL                
                AMERICA 1-60; Gage, TRAVELS.                                        
                                                                                    
         J.  The French Corsairs, 1522-1570                                         
                                                                                    
         K.  The English Sea Dogs, 1462-1604                                        
                                                                                    
         L.  The Dutch Sea Beggars, 1595-1648                                       
                                                                                    
         M.  The Buccaneers 1640-1680                                               
                                                                                    
         N.  Piracy, 1670-1720                                                      
                                                                                    
         O.  The Intercolonial Wars, 1689-1763                                      
                                                                                    
         P.  Slavery and the 18th-Century Rise of the British and French Sugar      
              Colonies.                                                             
                                                                                    
         Q.  The Bourbon Reforms in the Caribbean Basin                             
                                                                                    
         R.  The Caribbean and the American Revolution                              
                                                                                    
         S.  The Caribbean and the French (and Haitian) Revolution                  
                                                                                    
         T.  The Caribbean and the Spanish-American Wars for Independence           
                                                                                    
         U.  The Emergence of a Caribbean Culture                                   
                                                                                    
              FINAL EXAMINATION, Saturday, 14 December, 9 a.m.                      
                   Read:  Knight, CARIBBEAN, pp. 120-222; Woodward, CENTRAL         
                   AMERICA, pp. 61-91; Wortman, GOVERNMENT & SOCIETY; Mintz,        
                   SWEETNESS & POWER                                                
    

    IV. TERM PAPER: Each student should select a topic relating to the history

         of the Caribbean Basin before 1821.  It is advisable to select this topic  
         in consultation with your instructor, but in any case you should explain   
         the topic in a paragraph or two, submitted on or before Thursday, 12       
         September.  A bibliography of works you intend to use in your study should 
         be turned in by 15 October and an outline of your paper by 12 November.    
         The paper is due on the last day of classes.  While there is no minimum or 
         maximum length for the papers, since the topic you choose will determine   
         to some degree the length, this paper should be approached as if it were   
         an article for a scholarly journal.  An average length would be about 20   
         pages.  All papers should be typewritten, double-spaced.  They should be   
         carefully documented in standard historical form (See Kate Turabian, A     
         MANUAL FOR WRITERS OF TERM PAPERS, THESES, AND DISSERTATIONS, latest       
         edition), with footnotes or endnotes indicating the sources of all your    
         information, not merely the sources of quotations.  Normally, this means a 
         note at the conclusion of each paragraph, indicating the sources of        
         information in that paragraph.                                             
    

    V. EXAMINATIONS & GRADES: There will be mid-term and a final examination in

         this course.  Exams will require students to write perceptive essays on    
         historical topics, incorporating information and interpretations from both 
         the reading assignments and the lectures.  Final grades will be based 30%  
         on the paper, 30% on the mid-term, and 40% on the final exam.              
    

    VI. SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS. Graduate students will be

         asked to write one bibliographical essay on the mid-term exam and the      
         final exam, in which they discuss the historical literature on a topic     
         rather than the topic itself.  This means that they need to familiarize    
         themselves with the historical literature of the Caribbean Basin.  The     
         bibliographical essays in Knight and Woodward should be helpful in         
         preparing for this requirement, as well as spending time browsing in the   
         Latin American Library.                                                    
    

    Information provider:
    Unit: H-Net program at UIC History Department Email: H-Net@uicvm.uic.edu
    Posted: 31 Aug 1994

    H-Net
Humanities & Social Sciences OnLine
    Humanities &
    Social Sciences Online
    in cooperation with MSU Department of History
    Send comments and questions to H-LatAm Editors
    Copyright © 1995-2014
    H-LatAm RSS