Syllabus Contest
and Database

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2010 Winners

2008 Winners

2006 Winners

The 2010 Contest  

The H-German editors have once again solicited submissions of syllabi for the second biennial H-German Syllabus Contest. Our membership did not disappoint; we received nearly 50 syllabi for courses taught in varying disciplines and different educational systems.  Indeed, we found that the categories we offered to be inadequate to the diversity of material submitted by H-German members.  The syllabi ranged from overviews of German history to focused seminars on the Nazi period to a variety of more specialized topics including "Berlin," "Germans as Victims," and "The German Physiognomic Tradition." We heartily thank all those who allowed their syllabi to be included in the contest.  

A committee of five judges -- all members of the H-German Advisory Committee, Dirk Moses, Karin Friedrich, Paul Steege, Andreas Daum and Annette Timm, -- had the pleasure of perusing the work of their colleagues.  This was an intense and instructive process for the judges, all of whom have been inspired by the intellectual and pedagogical issues raised in these documents.  The judges were particularly pleased as well to have the opportunity to view syllabi from interdisciplinary courses as well as those with a primarily literary approach.  The submissions blended intellectual rigor and comprehensiveness, many containing an intriguing combination of primary documents and secondary sources, as well as impressively substantial bibliographies and inventive assignments.  They also raised fascinating issues of what constitutes an elegant syllabus; is it best to be more detailed in assignments and readings or concise on themes.  The following syllabi were chosen for best incorporating all these qualities.

The 2010 Contest Winners
General courses  

 Winner:

Elizabeth Heineman
University of Iowa
Germany since 1914  

Honorable Mention:

Jeff Bowersox
University of Southern Mississippi
History of the German Lands in the 19th and 20th Centuries
Honorable Mention: Quinn Slobodian
Wellsley College
Looking at the Three Postwar Germanies

The judges were impressed by the range and clear structure of Heineman’s syllabus.  They had the same comments for Bowersox and Slobodian, noting that the former clearly defined his pedagogical goals and had a good balance in terms of workloads, while the latter had original assignments and excellent sources.

 

Seminars/Specific Topic Courses  

This was by far the largest and most diverse category and the judges had a very difficult time narrowing down their choices.  We hope,therefore, that our membership will excuse us for selecting only one winner out a a diverse and high-quality group of syllabi

 Winner:

Volker Benkert
Arizona State University
History, Memory and National Myths: Changing European Master Narratives After WWII

 Honorable Mention:

Elizabeth Vlossak
Brock University
Weimar Germany

The judges were impressed that Benkert took a conceptually challenging topic and made it accessible to undergraduates without losing texture.  They also found this to be a timely topic that showed the broader relevance of History as a discipline.  The committee appreciated the combination of rigor and readings found in Vlossack’s syllabus. 

Nazi Germany/Holocaust Courses  

Winner:

Todd Weir
Queen’s University Belfast
Fascism and its Legacy in Germany: 1918 to 2005  

Honorable Mention:

Astrid M. Eckert and Sander Gilman
Emory University
Nazi Medicine

Here again the judges had a difficult time coming to a decision. The judges thought that Weir’s syllabus represented the best of the British system; excellent questions and a long but well thought-out reading list.  It was also very clear on course goals.

   
Interdisciplinary Courses  
Winner: Thomas O. Haakenson
Minneapolis College of Art and Design
The Grotesque  
Honorable Mention: Manuela Achilles
University of Virginia
Generation Green  (Generation Green Guest Lecturers )  
Honorable Mention: Andrew Bergerson and K. Scott Baker
University of Missouri -- Kansas City
Introduction to German Studies  

The committee also struggled to pick a clear winner in this category.  The judges felt that Haakenson had taken a unique approach that was still focused with clearly articulated goals.  The judges appreciated how hard Achilles and Bergerson/Baker worked to produce syllabi that do justice to the methods of multiple disciplines.

 
       
Graduate Courses

Winner:

Melissa Feinberg
Rutgers University
 Readings in Modern European History  

The judges felt this syllabus did a good job of combining traditional and innovative themes with a comprehensive reading list.

 
Interesting Assignments  
2010 Mary Jo Maynes and Marynel Ryan van Zee
University of Minnesota

Explanation

Project 1 media and genres of documentation

Project 2 Walking the City       
Project 3 Topographies of Gender                          

Project 4 Neues Bauen

 

 

For this study abroad course, Maynes asked students to complete on of four projects such as completing a walking tour of Berlin.  The assignment contained background readings, primary sources, and guides to making it around Berlin.  The committee felt this was a thoughtful way of approaching such courses.

   
The 2008 Contest Winners
General courses  

 Winner:

Jonathan Zatlin

Boston University

Germany 1914 to the Present  

Honorable Mention:

Thomas Pegelow Kaplan

Davidson College

History of Germany in Global Context, 1871-1990

The judges were impressed by the range and quality of the readings used in Zatlin's syllabus and its combination of political, social and cultural history.  Pegelow Kaplan's syllabus drew special mention from the judges because of its varied writing assignments and the clarity with which the larger research project was set out and its progress integrated into the semester schedule.

Seminars/Specific Topic Courses  

This was by far the largest and most diverse category and the judges had a very difficult time narrowing down their choices.  We hope, therefore, that our membership will excuse us for dividing the glory of the win into three:

 Winner:

Julia Brüggemann

DePauw University

After Catastrophe: Germany and the Legacy of WWII
The judges found this course to be extremely timely, not only in terms of current events (such as ongoing debates about memory and memorialization in Germany) but also in terms of the recent flood of scholarship on these topics.

 Winner:

Hoi-eun Kim

Texas A & M University

Medicine and Empire: Germany and Japan, 1868-1945

This comparative syllabus struck the judges as well described, and as having an obvious intrinsic appeal to students.  The choice of readings, especially the inclusion of anthropology along with recent historical scholarship was of particular note.

 Winner:

Dorothee Brantz

Technische Universität Berlin

1968: Year of Protest, Year of Change

The judges found this course to be extremely well conceived as well as timely. The syllabus demonstrated an impressive mastery of these various locations, and the judges felt the class would be excellent preparation for graduate students as well as advanced history students, since anyone wishing to explore this period will be forced to take this international approach.

The judges again wanted to draw particular note of the other entrants in this extremely diverse category (to be found in the syllabus database).  A number of the syllabi include remarkable bibliographies.  Moreover, an impressive number of the syllabi had a predominantly literary focus, which the judges found instructive.

Nazi Germany/Holocaust Courses  

Winner:

Thomas Kühne

Clark University

The Holocaust Perpetrators  

Honorable Mention:

Thomas Weber

School of Historical Studies,
Institute for Advanced Study

The Holocaust - Ghetto Life in its Historical Context

Here again the judges had a difficult time coming to a decision. Kuehne's syllabus was deemed particularly noteworthy for its interesting approach, departing from the now conventional breakdown of perpetrator/victim/bystander by focusing on just one of these terms.  The readings are commensurately varied and provocative. Weber's syllabus offered a challenging and constructive approach to teaching ‘Holocaust’: giving such prominence to the history of the ghetto enables & encourages attention to the contingencies and the daily lives of people & the problems of survival in an unknown environment. The syllabus was very well set up with well-chosen, wide-ranging readings and excellent questions built in week by week.  The judges also wanted to recognize that in many of the institutions where our members teach (particularly those in the United States), classes on these topics draw a broader selection of students, many of whom will have little or no background in the subject.  The judges thus wanted to recognize the syllabus of Thomas Adam, which, in their opinion, skillfully introduced a wide variety of ways of thinking about National Socialism that would engage both specialists and non-specialists.

Graduate Courses  

Winner:

Astrid Eckert

Emory University

Writing History, Fighting History. Controversies in German Historiography after 1945

Astrid Eckert's syllabus is a clearly structured seminar with a well researched range of readings. The judges found it a scholarly syllabus which offers a very firm grounding in recent German historiography, absolutely ideal for graduates going on to teach the field.

Winner:

Brian Vick

University of Colorado

Readings in European Politics and Culture, 1860-1914

Brian Vick's more thematic seminar also impressed the judges with its breadth of readings.  It, too, is a strong preparation for field work at the doctoral stage but also would provide outstanding instruction for graduate students not specializing in German history.

The 2006 Contest  

 

In mid February 2006, the H-German editors solicited members to submit syllabi for the first biennial H-German Syllabus contest. We received approximately fifty syllabi for courses ranging from overviews of German history to focused seminars on the Nazi period to a variety of more eclectic topics such as “Music and Politics in Europe from Wagner to the 1960s” or “Franco-German Relations after 1945.” We thank all those who offered their syllabi for inclusion in the contest.

 

A committee of four judges – three members of the H-German Advisory Committee, Shelley Baranowski, Glenn Ehrstine, and Peter Fritzsche, and one H-German editor, Eve Duffy – happily perused the work of their colleagues. Many of the syllabi blended intellectual rigor, comprehensiveness, an engaging mix of interesting primary documents and secondary sources, as well as a certain inventiveness. The following syllabi were chosen for best incorporating all these qualities.

 

The 2006 Contest Winners  
General courses      

Winner:

Daniel Becker
Brandeis University
Modern Germany 1870-1990  
Solid introduction to the field of modern Germany. Reviewers were most impressed with the writing assignments, which were imaginative, varied, and excellent. The research paper asked students to focus on major debates in the field; also of note is the final "course portfolio".
Seminars/Specific Topic Courses    

Winner:

Astrid Eckert
Emory University
Germany after 1945: Reconstruction & Memory
Wonderfully centered on two seemingly opposing topics, divergence and convergence, this course is well thought out, imaginative, and an inspiring introduction to the period.

Winner:

David Tompkins
University of Tennessee
Music and Politics in Europe from Wagner to the 1960s
Although a traditional course in terms of its classical emphasis, this is nonetheless a refreshing take on a well-trodden theme, namely the history of 19th and 20th century Europe. Tomkins's linking of music and politics is extremely intriguing.

Winner:

Carine Germond
Yale University
Franco-German Relations after 1945
Germond's syllabus transcends the nation-state to focus on the Franco-German relationship, and her readings include very good use of on-line primary source materials.
Nazi Germany/Holocaust Courses    

Winner:

Alexandra Garbarini
Williams College
The History of the Holocaust  
This course considers victims, perpetrators, and the memory of the Holocaust. The reading list is very strong and the course gets students into the geography of the Holocaust.
Graduate Courses      

Winner:

Margaret L. Anderson
University of California at Berkeley
History and Historiography of the German Problem
Incredibly thorough coverage of the field, which includes the Austrian Empire under the rubric of "Germany." Students can get a clear view of major historiographical debates just by reading through the syllabus. Detailed discussion not only of important themes, but of major journals; supplemental materials are extensive: an amazing introduction to the field. Although traditional in terms of its approach and definition of the field, this syllabus stands out for its comprehensiveness.
Syllabus Database  
The editors have assembled the syllabus database in the hopes that it will serve as a useful resource to both newer and more established scholars alike, whether for developing new courses and techniques, tweaking established courses, or simply drawing on the collective pedagogical and intellectual expertise of fellow subscribers.  
If you did not submit a syllabus for the contest, but would like us to add yours to the list, please forward the materials to Christopher Fischer  cfischer@isugw.indstate.edu or contact the editor-on-duty at <H-German@H-NET.MSU.EDU>.
Please note: All syllabi are here by courtesy of the authors of the specific syllabi. They therefore remain the intellectual property of the authors and should not be redistributed or used for commercial purposes without the consent of the authors.
Click titles to jump to a specific section
  General Courses  
  Seminar/Specific Topic Courses  
Nazi Germany/Holocaust Courses
  Interdisciplinary Courses  
  Graduate Courses
  Interesting Assignments
General courses
2006 Margaret L. Anderson
University of California at Berkeley

The Rise and Fall of the Second Reich

2006 Daniel Becker
Brandeis University
Modern Germany 1870-1990
2006 Andrew Donson
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Modern German, 1789 to the present
2006 *Christopher Fischer
Indiana State University
Germany, 1870 to the Present
2006 Bryan Ganaway
Presbyterian College
Modern Germany
2006 Michael Hayse
Stockton College of New Jersey
History of Modern Germany
2006 Dennis Klein
Kean College

History of Germany, 1805 to the Present: The Interplay of Ideas and Power

2006 Jeffrey Myers
Avila University
Germany: Nineteenth Century
German: Twentieth Century
2006 William Patch
Washington & Lee University
Germany from Unification to Reunification
Course Website: Germany
2006 Catherine Plum
Western New England College
History of Modern Germany 1848 - Present
2008

Kenneth C. Barnes

University of Central Arkansas

Germany Since 1918

2008

Benita Blessing

Ohio University

Twentieth Century Germany
2008

Laura M. Eidt

University of Dallas

Deutsche Kultur und Geschichte des 20. Jahrhunderts

2008

Eagle Glassheim

University of British Columbia

History of Modern Germany
2008

Thomas Pegelow Kaplan

Davidson College

History of Germany in Global Context, 1871-1990

2008

Martin A. Ruehl

Trinity Hall (Cambridge University)

History and identity in Germany, 1750 to the present
2008

Lisa Stallbaumer-Beishline

Bloomsburg University

Twentieth Century German History

2008

Brian Vick

University of Colorado

Modern German History since 1849

2008

Jonathan Zatlin

Boston University

Germany 1914 to the Present

2010 Jeff Bowersox
University of Southern Mississippi

History of the German Lands in the 19th and 20th Centuries

2010 Elun Gabriel
St. Lawrence University
Modern German History
2010 Robert Goodrich
Northern Michigan University
Early Modern Europe
2010 J. Laurence Hare
University of Arkansas
Postwar Germany
2010 Elizabeth Heineman
University of Iowa
Germany since 1914
2010 Maria Mitchell
Franklin & Marshall College
Modern Germany
2010 Brendan Karch
Harvard University

Order and Conquest: Modern Central Europe

2010 Christian Lieb,
University of Victoria

Imperial Germany,1870–1918

2010 Stephen J. Scala
Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies

The Two Germanys and the Cold War

2010 Quinn Slobodian
Wellsley College
Looking at the Three Postwar Germanies
2010 Edith Sheffer
Stanford University
Germany and the Two World Wars
2010 Aeleah Soine
Macalester College
German History Reformation to Unification
2010 Aeleah Soine
Macalester College
Modern Germany
2010 Mark R. Stoneman
George Mason University
Modern Germany
2010 Lisa Stallbaumer Beishline
Bloomsburg University
Twentieth Century German History
2010 Guillaume de Syon
Albright College
Modern Germany

 

Seminars/Specific Topic Courses
2006 *Susan Boettcher
University of Texas at Austin
Europe in the Age of Reformation
Martin Luther in History and Memory
2006 Andrew Donson
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Nineteenth-Century German Thought
The Weimar Republic
2006 Astrid Eckert
Emory University
Germany after 1945: Reconstruction & Memory
2006 Alexandra Garbarini
Williams College
Before the Deluge: Paris and Berlin in the Interwar Years
2006 Carine Germond
Yale University
Franco-German Relations after 1945
2006 Ronald Granieri
University of Pennsylvania
The German Century, 1890-1990
2006 Jeremy King
Mount Holyoke College
From Habsburg to Hitler:  Bohemian Politics,1848-1948
2006 Dennis B. Klein
Kean College
Weimar Germany: The New World of Mass Culture and Chronic Conflict
2006 Jonathon Levy
Hebrew University
From Weimar to the Third Reich, 1918 – 1939
2006 Harold Marcuse
Univ. of California at Santa Barbara

Germany since 1945: Dealing with Legacies of Dictatorship
Course Weblink: History 133c

2006 Patricia Mazón
State University of New York at Buffalo
Topics in Modern German History
2006 *M. E. Menninger
Texas State University at San Marcos
Sex, Drugs and Cabaret: Europe, 1880-1914
2006 Catherine Plum
Western New England College
East German Society & Culture, 1949-1989
2006 Timothy Pursell
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Modern Germany
2006 Ian Reifowitz
SUNY Empire State
The Vienna of Hitler and Freud
2006 Adam Seipp
Texas A&M University
War and European Society in the Twentieth Century
2006 David Tompkins
University of Tennessee

Music and Politics in Europe from Wagner to the 1960s

2006 Liliane Weissberg
University of Pennsylvania
Freud: The Invention of Psychoanalysis
2008

Manuela Achilles

University of Virginia

Neighbors and Enemies in Modern Germany
2008

Nina Berman

Ohio State University

Germans in Africa
2008

Daniela Blei

Stanford University

From the Constitution to the Cabaret: Art and Politics in the Weimar Republic

2008

Richard Bodek

College of Charleston

The Cultural History of the Germany: Outsiders from the Kaiserreich to the Thir d Reich
2008

Susan Boettcher**

University of Texas, Austin

Jews and Judaism since 1492
2008

Dorothee Brantz

Technische Universität Berlin

1968: Year of Protest, Year of Change
2008

Dorothee Brantz

Technische Universität Berlin

Stadtwahrnehmung und städtisches Selbstverständnis Zur Geschichte der Straße

2008

Julia Brüggemann

DePauw University

After Catastrohe: Germany and the Legacy of World War II
2008

Brendan Fay

Indiana University

Beethoven: Napoleon to the Nazis, 1810-1989
2008

Peter Hess

University of Texas at Austin

Switzerland and Europe: Integration or  Isolation?
2008

Hoi-eun Kim

Texas A & M University

Medicine and Empire: Germany and Japan, 1868-1945
2008

Lynn M. Kutch

Kutztown University

Women's Representation of World War II and the Holocaust
2008

Michael Mackenzie

DePauw University

Art and Literature in Paris and Berlin
2008

Edward Mathieu

Beloit College

Fascism
2008

James Palmitessa

Western Michigan University

The Thirty Years War
2008

Brian Puaca

Christopher Newport University

Remembering World War II in European Cinema
2008

Claudia Pummer

University of Iowa

German Cinema: From Division to Post-Unification

2008

Peter J. Ramberg

Truman State University

Science in Germany, 1800-1945
2008

Christian Rogowski

Amherst College

Comedy and Humor
2008

Christian Rogowski

Amherst College

Popular Cinema
2008

Anne Rothe

Wayne State University

Children and Childhood in 19th- & 20th-Century German Culture

2008

Martin A. Ruehl

Trinity Hall (Cambridge University)

Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in Modern European Thought
2008

Martin A. Ruehl

Trinity Hall (Cambridge University)

European Fascism, 1919 to the Present
2008

Greg Shealy

University of Wisconsin, Madison

Germany in the Long Nineteenth Century

2008

Todd Weir

Queen's University Belfast

Critic or Prophet? The Intellectual in Modern Germany

2008

Jonathan Zatlin

Boston University

The Historian's Craft: Twentieth-Century Germany

2008

Jonathan Zatlin

Boston University

Jews in Modern German History

2010 Kit Belgum
University of Texas at Austin
German Nationalisms
2010 Volker Benkert
Arizona State University
Masternarratives
2010 Dennis Crockett
Whitman College 
German Visual Culture
2010 Melissa Feinberg
Rutgers University

The Modern Girl

2010 Katharina Matro
Stanford University
Berlin Divided City
2010 Mirko M. Hall
Converse College 
German Intellectual History
2010 Daniel H. Magilow
University of Tennessee – Knoxville
Nation, Race, Ethnicity: Germans as Victims?
2010 Daniel H. Magilow
University of Tennessee – Knoxville

The German Physiognomic Tradition

2010 Sonja L. Merkel
University of Wisconsin
Jews in Germany
2010 Martin A. Ruehl
Trinity Hall
Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment
2010 Paul Rutschmann
University Texas at Arlington
Weimar: The Golden Twenties
2010 Elizabeth Vlossak
Brock University
Weimar Germany
2010 Alice Weinreb
Northwestern University

From World War to Cold War:  The Politics and Cultures of Occupied Germany 1945-1949

2010 Cecile Zorach
Franklin & Marshall College
Germany Concealed & Revealed
     

 

Nazi Germany/Holocaust Courses
2006 Andrew Donson
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
The Holocaust as History
Nazi Germany
2006 *Christopher Fischer
Indiana State University
Nazi Germany and the Holocaust
2006 Alexandra Garbarini
Williams College
The History of the Holocaust
2006 Bonnie Harris
UC Santa Barbara
Holocaust Memorialization: National & International Perspectives
2006 Michael Hayse
Stockton College of New Jersey
History of the Third Reich
2006 Christopher R. Jackson
San Francisco State University
The Holocaust and Genocide
German National Socialism
2006 Jeremy King
Mount Holyoke College
The Holocaust in History
2006 Dennis B. Klein
Kean College
The Nazi Era: The Politics and Culture of Totalitarianism
2006 Arnold Krammer
Texas A&M University
Nazi Germany
2006 Harold Marcuse
Univ. of California at Santa Barbara
Portraying the Perpetrators (Lower Division)
Course Weblink: Portraying
Readings on the Holocaust (Upper Lower Division)
2006 *M. E. Menninger
Texas State University at San Marcos
Germany and National Socialism
2006 Nancy Nenno/Richard Bodek
College of Charleston
From Weimar to Hitler: Modern Culture -- Degenerate Culture -- Nazi Culture
2006 Sara Sewell
Virginia Wesleyan College
The Holocaust
2008

Thomas Adam

University of Texas-Arlington

Hitler: History and Image
2008 David Brenner

Die Darstellung des Holocaust im Film – Representing the Holocaust in Film

2008

Thomas Kuehne

Clark University

The Holocaust Perpetrators

2008

Erin McGlothlin

Washington University in St. Louis

Children in the Shadow of the Swastika

2008

Eli Rubin

Western Michigan University

The Holocaust in History and Memory

2008

Lisa Stallbaumer-Beishline

Bloomsburg University

History of the Holocaust
2008

Lisa Stallbaumer-Beishline

Bloomsburg University

Hitler and the Third Reich
2008

Thomas Weber

School of Historical Studies, Institute for Advanced Study

The Holocaust - Ghetto Life in its Historical Context
2008

Richard Wetzell

German Historical Institute, DC/Georgetown University

Nazi Germany
2010 Matt Bera
York University

Germany and the Nazi Past

2010 Jeff Bowersox
University of Southern Mississippi
Nazi Germany
2010 Astrid M. Eckert and Sander Gilman
Emory University
Nazi Medicine
2010 K. Hannah Holtschneider
New College
Visual Representation of the Holocaust
2010 Martin A. Ruehl
Trinity Hall
European Fascism
2010 Roland Spickermann
University of Texas – Permian Basin
The Third Reich and the Holocaust
2010 Edith Shaked
Pima Community College
The Holocaust
2010 Todd Weir
Queen’s University Belfast

Fascism and its Legacy in Germany: 1918 to 2005

2010 Jonathan Wiesen
Southern Illinois University

The Holocaust in History and Literature

     

 

Interdisciplinary Courses
2010 Manuela Achilles
University of Virginia
Generation Green  (Generation Green Guest Lectures)
2010 Kit Belgum
University of Texas at Austin
German Travel Literature
2010 Andrew Bergerson and K. Scott Baker
University of Missouri -- Kansas City
Introduction to German Studies
2010 Oliver Griffin, St. John Fisher College  Swastika on Celluloid
2010 Thomas O. Haakenson
Minneapolis College of Art and Design
The Grotesque
2010 Christelle Le Faucheur
University of Texas, Austin
German History through its Cinema

 

Graduate Courses
2006 Eric Anderson
Cooper-Hewitt/Parsons
Historicism and Decorative Arts Theory in Germany and Austria, 1851-1901
2006 Margaret L. Anderson
University of California at Berkeley
History and Historiography of the German Problem
2006 Bonnie Harris
San Diego State
Holocaust Memorialization: National & International Perspectives
2006 Harold Marcuse
Univ. of California at Santa Barbara
Readings on German History
2006 Patricia Mazón
State University of New York at Buffalo
Readings in 20th-Century German History
2008

Astrid Eckert

Emory University

Writing History, Fighting History. Controversies in German Historiography after 1945

2008

Erin McGlothlin

Washington University in St. Louis

Representing the Holocaust
2008

James Palmitessa

Western Michigan University

Readings in Central Europe (to 1378)

2008

James Palmitessa

Western Michigan University

Readings in Central Europe, 1378-1806
2008

Anne Rothe

Wayne State University

Memory, Trauma, and Holocaust Representation
2008

Brian Vick

University of Colorado

Readings in European Politics and Culture, 1860-1914

2010 Jeff Bowersox
University of Southern Mississippi

Nazi Germany

2010 Melissa Feinberg
Rutgers University
Readings in Modern European History
2010

Astrid Eckert

Emory University

Writing History, Fighting History. Controversies in German Historiography after 1945

     
 
Interesting Assignments
2010 Thomas O. Haakenson
Minneapolis College of Art and Design
Project Kafka
2010

Mary Jo Maynes and Marynel Ryan van Zee
University of Minnesota

Explanation

Project 1 media and genres of documentation

Project 2 Walking the City       
Project 3 Topographies of Gender                          

Project 4 Neues Bauen

2010 Edith Sheffer
Stanford University
Creating Lives

*The syllabi of H-German editors were not included in the contest.


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