Table of Contents 21.1 (2001)   22.1 (2002) ISSN 1943-3840

Cervantes


VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 2 FALL, 2001


Dale Wasserman

Dale Wasserman


Bulletin of the Cervantes Society of America


Cervantes

Bulletin of the CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA


THE CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

President
EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN

Vice President
JAMES A. PARR

Secretary-Treasurer
THERESA SEARS

Executive Council

ELLEN ANDERSON      MW NINA COX DAVIS
MARINA BROWNLEE NE PATRICIA KENWORTHY
ANTHONY CÁRDENAS PC GEORGE SHIPLEY
MICHAEL MCGAHA SE ILUMINADA AMAT
ADRIENNE MARTIN SW JOSEPH V. RICAPITO

CERVANTES: BULLETIN OF THE CERVANTES SOCIETY OF AMERICA

Editor: DANIEL EISENBERG

Managing Editor: FRED JEHLE

Book Review Editor: WILLIAM H. CLAMURRO

Editorial Board

JOHN J. ALLEN      MYRIAM YVONNE JEHENSON
ANTONIO BERNAT CARROLL B. JOHNSON
PATRIZIA CAMPANA FRANCISCO MÁRQUEZ VILLANUEVA
PETER DUNN FRANCISCO RICO
JAIME FERNÁNDEZ GEORGE SHIPLEY
EDWARD H. FRIEDMAN ALISON P. WEBER
AURELIO GONZÁLEZ DIANA DE ARMAS WILSON

Cervantes, official organ of the Cervantes Society of America, publishes scholarly articles in English and Spanish on Cervantes' life and works, reviews, and notes of interest to cervantistas. Twice yearly. Subscription to Cervantes is a part of membership in the Cervantes Society of America, which also publishes a Newsletter. $20.00 a year for individuals, $40.00 for institutions, $30.00 for couples, and $10.00 for students. Membership is open to all persons interested in Cervantes. For membership and subscription, send check in US dollars to THERESA SEARS, Department of Romance Languages, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170 tasears@uncg.edu. Manuscripts should be sent in duplicate, together with a self-addressed envelope and return postage, to DANIEL EISENBERG, Editor, Cervantes, Excelsior College, 7 Columbia Circle, Albany, NY 12203-5157 (daniel.eisenberg@bigfoot.com). The SOCIETY requires anonymous submissions, therefore the author's name should not appear on the manuscript; instead, a cover sheet with the author's name, address, and the title of the article should accompany the article. References to the author's own work should be couched in the third person. Books for review should be sent to WILLIAM H. CLAMURRO, Division of Foreign Languages, Emporia State University, Emporia, Kansas 66801-5087 (clamurrw@emporia.edu).

Copyright © 2001 by the Cervantes Society of America.



Cervantes
VOLUME XXI, NUMBER 2
TABLE OF CONTENTS



ARTICLES
      Cervantes y la Quixotic Fiction: El hibridismo genérico
      JOHN G. ARDILA PDF 5
      Tobias Smollett's theoretical considerations on the novel appear throughout his literary career, e.g. in his prologue to Roderick Random or in the prologues to his translations of Gil Blas and Don Quixote. Smollett drew from the great models of the Spanish and French picaresque traditions as well as from Don Quixote —the influence of which is particularly evident in Sir Laucelot Greaves. This essay explores the chief quixotic element in Smollett's best-known novel, Humphry Clinker: its hybrid quality, i.e. the composition of the ideal novel as a composite of the previous and contemporary novelistic trends. Humphry Clinker is therefore a literary compendium of eighteenth-century novelistic schools —like Don Quixote was of the fifteenth-century Spanish novel.

      “Sola una de vuestras hermosas manos”: Desmembramiento petrarquista y disección anatómica en la venta (Don Quijote, I, 43) PDF
      ENRIQUE FERNÁNDEZ 27
      The episode in which Maritornes and the innkeeper's daughter attract Don Quixote to a hole in the wall where they hang him from his hand is a parody of the dismemberment of the female body in the Petrarchan tradition. The parody is achieved through a comical feminization of Don Quixote's body through a role reversal and through a cruel actualization of the dissective elements implied in the rhetoric of poetic bodily dismemberment. Don Quixote hanging from his hand is similar to corpses hanging by their hands for dissection, an image common in the anatomical books and in the anatomical theaters so popular in this period. The humor and horror of this scene reflect the anxiety —the combination of curiosity and fear— that dissected bodies arouse in a period when the anatomical science was dismembering the human body, the cornerstone around which human individuality was being constructed.

      Heroics of Persuasion in Cervantes' Trabajos de Persiles y Sigismunda PDF
      CAROLYN LUKENS-OLSON 51
      Los trabajos de Persiles y Sigismunda es una novela de caballerías de otra índole. De hecho, es una obra de alto contenido político, cuyo héroe no ciñe espada. A lo largo de la acción, es la persuasión y no la coerción el arma que usa Persiles, elocuente y prudente orador, para proteger al grupo de peregrinos al que acompaña durante su largo y tortuoso viaje a Roma. Este estudio señala también la eficacia de este modus operandi de Persiles, y cómo la alternativa, la coerción violenta, tiene consecuencias nefastas. Mi conclusión es que, con Los trabajos de Persiles y Sigismunda, Cervantes propone un nuevo paradigma de lo heroico.

      Themes of Exile in Thomas Mann's “Voyage with Don Quixote” PDF
      GENE R. PENDLETON and LINDA L. WILLAMS 73
      El ensayo “Viaje con Don Quijote” describe las experiencias de Thomas Mann a bordo del vapor que le llevaba a los Estados Unidos. Durante el viaje leía la obra de Cervantes. Con la figura de Ricote como punto de partida, medita el exilio. El ensayo es una crítica del fascismo, filosofía contraria a los principios morales del europeo verdadero.

      “Un millón de avemarías”: El rosario en Don Quijote PDF
      ROBERTO VÉGUEZ 87
      As an instrument of religious devotion, the rosary acquired renewed importance through its papally decreed association with the battle of Lepanto. The victory over the Turks on that occasion was perceived by Cervantes as the most important event of all times. And yet in Don Quijote, Cervantes presents the rosary bathed in satire, which in one instance went beyond the limits of endurance of the Portuguese Inquisition. In this article I study the seven appearances of the rosary in Don Quijote by placing each in its textual context. I then widen the focus by considering recent critical approaches within Bakhtinian and anthropological parameters. I conclude that the treatment of the rosary in Don Quijote may offer us a clue to the conflict between the new religiosity then being imposed by post-Tridentine Catholicism, and the popular manifestations of devotion prevalent at the time.


REVIEW ARTICLE

      “Bendito sea Alá”: A New Edition of Belianís de Grecia PDF
      HOWARD MANCING 111


DOCUMENTS

      A Diary for I, Don Quixote PDF
      DALE WASSERMAN 117

      I, Don Quixote PDF
      DALE WASSERMAN 125


REVIEWS PDF

      James Iffland. De fiestas y aguafiestas: risa, locura e ideología en Cervantes y Avellaneda. PDF
      THERESA ANN SEARS 215

      Ronald Paulson. Don Quixote in England. The Aesthetics of Laughter. PDF
      ANTHONY CLOSE 220

      Rachel Schmidt. Critical Images. The Canonization of Don Quixote through Illustrated Editions of the Eighteenth Century. PDF
      ANTHONY G. LO RÉ 222

      Ingeniosa Invención: Essays on Golden Age Spanish Literature for Geoffrey L. Stagg in Honor of his Eighty-fifth Birthday. PDF
      VINCENT MARTIN 227

      K. Sliwa. Documentos cervantinos. Nueva recopilación; lista e índices. PDF
      JOSÉ MONTERO REGUERA 230


[BACK COVER]

I Don Quixote Bill


21.1 (2000) 22.1 (2002)
Fred Jehle jehle@ipfw.edu Publications of the CSA HCervantes
URL: http://www.h-net.org/~cervantes/csa/bcsaf01.htm